here

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See also: herė, hère, and Here

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English here, from Old English hēr (in this place), from Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, from Proto-Indo-European *ki- (this) + adverbial suffix *-r. Cognate with the English pronoun he, German hier, Dutch hier, her, Icelandic hér, Faroese, Norwegian, Danish her, Swedish här.

Adverb[edit]

here (not comparable)

  1. (location) In, on, or at this place.
    I'm here!
  2. (location) To this place; used in place of the more dated hither.
    Please come here.
  3. (abstract) In this context.
    Derivatives can refer to anything that is derived from something else, but here they refer specifically to functions that give the slope of the tangent line to a curve.
  4. At this point in the argument or narration.
    Here endeth the lesson.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

here (uncountable)

  1. (abstract) This place; this location.
    An Alzheimer patient's here may in his mind be anywhere he called home in the time he presently re-lives.
  2. (abstract) This time, the present situation.
    Here in history, we are less diligent about quashing monopolies.
Quotations[edit]
  • 1922, Francis Herbert Bradley, The Principles of Logic‎, page 52:
    For time and extension seem continuous elements; the here is one space with the other heres round it
  • 2001, Kauhiko Yatabe; edited by Harumi Befu, Sylvie Guichard-Anguis, “Objects, city and wandering: the invisibility of the Japanese in France”, in Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America‎, page 28:
    More than ever, the here is porous.
  • 2004, Denis Wood, Five Billion Years of Global Change: A History of the Land‎, page 20:
    We can't see it because it is an aspect of our seeing, it is a function of our gaze: the field of the here is established in — and by — our presence.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

here (comparative more here, superlative most here)

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  1. Filler after a noun or demonstrative pronoun, solely for emphasis.
    John here is a rascal.
  2. Filler after a demonstrative pronoun but before the noun it modifies, solely for emphasis.
    This here orange is too sour.

Interjection[edit]

here

  1. (UK, slang) Used for emphasis at the beginning of a sentence when expressing an opinion or want.
    Here, I'm tired and I want a drink.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Scots heir, from Middle English here, heere (army), from Old English here (army), from Proto-Germanic *harjaz (army), from Proto-Indo-European *kory- (war, troops). Cognate with Old Saxon heri (army), Dutch heer, heir, Old High German heri, hari (army) (German Heer), Danish hær (army), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐍂𐌾𐌹𐍃 (harjis, army). More at harry.

Noun[edit]

here (plural heres)

  1. An army, host.
  2. A hostile force.
  3. (Anglo-Saxon) An invading army, either that of the enemy, or the national troops serving abroad. Compare fyrd.
  4. An enemy, individual enemy.
Related terms[edit]

Statistics[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -eːrə
  • Hyphenation: he‧re

Noun[edit]

here m (plural heren, diminutive heertje n)

  1. (archaic) inflected form of heer (lord)

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛrɛ/
  • Hyphenation: he‧re

Noun[edit]

here (plural herék)

  1. A testicle
  2. A drone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *harjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *korio-. Cognate with Old Saxon heri (Dutch heer), Old High German heri (German Heer), Old Norse herr (Swedish här, Danish hær), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐍂𐌾𐌹𐍃 (harjis); the Proto-Indo-European root also gave Ancient Greek κοίρανος (koíranos), Middle Irish cuire, Baltic *kara- (Lithuanian kãras, Latvian karš).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

here m

  1. An army (especially of the enemy)
    Sio fierd ðone here gefliemde. The English force put the [Danish] army to flight. (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle)

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]