host

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See also: höst, høst, and hosť

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French oste (French: hôte), from Middle Latin hospitem, accusative of hospes (a host, also a sourjourner, visitor, guest; hence, a foreigner, a stranger), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóspot- (master of guests), from *gʰóstis (stranger, guest, host, someone with whom one has reciprocal duties of hospitality) and *pótis (owner, master, host, husband). Used in English since 13th century.

Noun[edit]

host (plural hosts)

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  1. A person who receives or entertains a guest, particularly into the host’s home.
    A good host is always considerate of the guest’s needs.
    • Shakespeare
      Time is like a fashionable host, / That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand.
  2. A person or organization responsible for running an event.
    Our company is host of the annual conference this year.
  3. A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
    The host was terrible, but the acts themselves were good.
  4. (computing, Internet, Unix) Any computer attached to a network.
  5. (biology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193: 
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    Viruses depend on the host that they infect in order to be able to reproduce.
  6. (evolutionism, genetics) An organism bearing certain genetic material.
    The so-called junk DNA is known, so far, to provide no apparent benefit to its host.
  7. Consecrated bread such as that used in the Christian ceremony of the Eucharist.
  8. A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

host (third-person singular simple present hosts, present participle hosting, simple past and past participle hosted)

  1. To perform the role of a host.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193: 
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
    Our company will host the annual conference this year.
    I was terrible at hosting that show.
    I’ll be hosting tonight. I hope I’m not terrible.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To lodge at an inn.
    • Shakespeare
      Where you shall host.
  3. (computing, Internet) To run software made available to a remote user or process.
    • 1987 May 7, Selden E. Ball, Jr., Re: Ethernet Terminal Concentrators, comp.protocols.tcp-ip, Usenet
      CMU/TEK TCP/IP software uses an excessive amount of cpu resources for terminal support both outbound, when accessing another system, and inbound, when the local system is hosting a session.
    Kremvax hosts a variety of services.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French hoste, from Middle Latin hostis (foreign enemy) (as opposed to inimicus (personal enemy)), cognate with etymology 1.

Noun[edit]

host (plural hosts)

  1. A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. X, Plugson of Undershot
      Why, Plugson, even thy own host is all in mutiny: Cotton is conquered; but the ‘bare backs’ — are worse covered than ever!
    • 2001, Carlos Parada, Hesione 2, Greek Mythology Link
      the invading host that had sailed from Hellas in more than one thousand ships was of an unprecedented size.
  2. A large number of items; a large inventory.
    A host of parts for my Model A.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English also oist, ost, from Old French hoiste, from Latin hostia (sacrificial victim).

Noun[edit]

host (plural hosts)

  1. (Catholicism) The consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hostis.

Noun[edit]

host m (plural hosts or hostos)

  1. army

See also[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gostь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

host m

  1. guest
    • 2009, Překlad 21 (Bible), Leviticus 17:15:
      Kdokoli, ať už domácí nebo host, by jedl něco zdechlého nebo rozsápaného, vypere si oděv, omyje se vodou a bude nečistý až do večera. Teprve pak bude čistý.

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English host.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

host m (plural hosts, diminutive hostje n)

  1. (computing) host
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From hossen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

host

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hossen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hossen

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Related to hosta/hoste ("to cough").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

host

  1. A single cough expulsion
Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

host

  1. imperative of hosta and hoste (Nynorsk)

Etymology 2[edit]

From English.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

host m

  1. (computing) host
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

host

  1. imperative of hoste