berg

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See also: Berg

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bergh, berg, from Old English berg, beorg (mountain, hill), from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ (height). Cognate with Dutch berg, German Berg, Swedish berg, and Russian берег (béreg).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

berg (plural bergs)

  1. Mountain, a large mass or hill.
    • 2004, Alan Goldfein, “A Wonderful Drive”, in Europe's Macadam, America's Tar: How America Really Compares to "Old Europe"[1], American Editions, ISBN 9783000143571, page 46:
      There are in fact many such subterranean underways in Germany, speeding traffic beneath bergs, burgs and villages and into and around and under big city downtowns ...
  2. An iceberg.
    • 1997, David J. Rugh; Kim E.W. Shelden, “Spotted Seals, Phoca Largha, in Alaska”, Marine Fisheries Review, volume 59, number 1, page 1: 
      The ice was thin, and only a few areas had bergs large enough to support marine mammals.

References[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch berg.

Noun[edit]

berg (plural berge, diminutive bergie)

  1. mountain
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

berg (present berg, present participle bergende, past participle geberg)

  1. to salvage, usually cargo from a ship
  2. to store; to stash; to put away
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch berch, from Old Dutch berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

berg m (plural bergen, diminutive bergje n)

  1. mountain, hill

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

berg

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bergen
  2. imperative of bergen

Faroese[edit]

Faroe stamp 186 suduroy - beinisvord.jpg

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

Noun[edit]

berg n (genitive singular bergs, plural berg)

  1. cliff, cliff face

Declension[edit]

n3 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative berg bergið berg bergini
Accusative berg bergið berg bergini
Dative bergi berginum bergum bergunum
Genitive bergs bergsins berga berganna

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

Noun[edit]

berg n (genitive singular bergs, nominative plural berg)

  1. a rock face

Derived terms[edit]


Limburgish[edit]

Noun[edit]

berg ?

  1. mountain

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bergaz.

Noun[edit]

berg m

  1. mountain, hill

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bergaz.

Noun[edit]

berg m

  1. mountain, hill

Descendants[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Noun[edit]

berg n

  1. rock, boulder
  2. cliff, precipice

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “berg” in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

Noun[edit]

berg m

  1. mountain, hill

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bjarg, berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

berg n

  1. a mountain
  2. bedrock, mine
    man har borrat genom berget, för att finna rikedom
    they have drilled through the bedrock, hoping to find wealth
    eld i berget!
    warning cry that an explosive charge has been ignited in a mine
  3. a mountain, a very large heap
    Ett berg med papper
    A mountain of paper

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]