pile

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See also: píle, pilé, pīle, and pīlē

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English pīl, from Latin pīlum. Cognate with Dutch pijl, German Pfeil.

Noun[edit]

pile (plural piles)

  1. (obsolete) A dart; an arrow.
  2. The head of an arrow or spear.
  3. A large stake, or piece of pointed timber, steel etc., driven into the earth or sea-bed for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe[1], edition 10th edition, published 1864, Chapter VI, page 68:
      All this time I worked very hard [...] and it is scarce credible what inexpressible labour everything was done with, especially the bringing piles out of the woods and driving them into the ground; for I made them much bigger than I needed to have done.
  4. (heraldry) One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Apparently from Late Latin pilus.

Noun[edit]

pile (plural piles)

  1. (usually in plural) A hemorrhoid.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle French pile, pille, from Latin pīla (pillar, pier).

Noun[edit]

pile (plural piles)

  1. A mass of things heaped together; a heap.
  2. (figuratively, informal) A group or list of related items up for consideration, especially in some kind of selection process.
    When we were looking for a new housemate, we put the nice woman on the "maybe" pile, and the annoying guy on the "no" pile.
    • 2011 December 29, Keith Jackson, “SPL: Celtic 1 Rangers 0”, Daily Record:
      And the moment it thumped into the net, Celtic’s march back to the top of the SPL pile also seemed unstoppable.
  3. A mass formed in layers.
    a pile of shot
  4. A funeral pile; a pyre.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  5. A large building, or mass of buildings.
    • Dryden
      The pile o'erlooked the town and drew the fight.
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, II.2:
      The pile is of a gloomy and massive, rather than of an elegant, style of Gothic architecture []
    • Thomas Hardy, The Well-Beloved
      It was dark when the four-wheeled cab wherein he had brought Avice from the station stood at the entrance to the pile of flats of which Pierston occupied one floor []
  6. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding heat; a fagot.
  7. A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; — commonly called Volta’s pile, voltaic pile, or galvanic pile.
  8. (obsolete) The reverse (or tails) of a coin.
  9. (figuratively) A list or league
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; — often with up; as, to pile up wood.
  2. (transitive) To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70: 
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
    We piled the camel with our loads.
  3. (transitive) To add something to a great number.
    • 2010 December 28, Owen Phillips, “Sunderland 0-2 Blackpool”, BBC:
      But as the second half wore on, Sunderland piled forward at every opportunity and their relentless pressure looked certain to be rewarded in the closing stages.
  4. (transitive) (of vehicles) To create a hold-up.
  5. (transitive, military) To place (guns, muskets, etc.) together in threes so that they can stand upright, supporting each other.
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Partly from Anglo-Norman pil (a variant of peil, poil (hair)) and partly from its source, Latin pilus (hair).

Noun[edit]

pile (plural piles)

  1. Hair, especially when very fine or short; the fine underfur of certain animals. (Formerly countable, now treated as a collective singular.)
  2. The raised hairs, loops or strands of a fabric; the nap of a cloth.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /piːlə/, [ˈpʰiːlə]

Noun[edit]

pile c

  1. plural indefinite of pil

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin pila (through Italian for the battery sense). The tail of a coin sense is probably derived from previous senses, but it's not known for sure.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pile f (plural piles)

  1. heap, stack
  2. pillar
  3. battery
  4. tails (of a coin)
  5. (heraldry) pile

Adverb[edit]

pile

  1. (colloquial) just, exactly
  2. (colloquial) dead (of stopping etc.); on the dot, sharp (of time), smack

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pile m (invariable)

  1. fleece (all senses)

Noun[edit]

pile

  1. plural form of pila

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

pile

  1. vocative singular of pilus

Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pile f

  1. dative singular of piła
  2. locative singular of piła

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *pilę.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pîle/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧le

Noun[edit]

pȉle n (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ле)

  1. chick

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pile

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of pilar.