just

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See also: Just and júst

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English juste, from Old French juste, from Latin iustus (just, lawful, rightful, true, due, proper, moderate), from ius (law, right). Cognate with Dutch & Scottish juist, French juste etc.

Adjective[edit]

just (comparative more just or juster, superlative most just or justest)

  1. Factually fair; right, correct; proper.
    It is a just assessment of the facts.
  2. Morally fair; upright; righteous, equitable.
    It looks like a just solution at first glance.
    • Shakespeare
      We know your grace to be a man / Just and upright.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adverb[edit]

just (not comparable)

  1. Only, simply, merely.
    Plant just a few tomatoes, unless you can, freeze, or dry them.
    He calls it vermilion, but it's just red to me.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room, which was just a lean-to hitched on to the end of the shanty, and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52: 
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. []   But viewed from high up in one of the growing number of skyscrapers in Sri Lanka’s capital, it is clear that something extraordinary is happening: China is creating a shipping hub just 200 miles from India’s southern tip.
    • 2013 June 14, Sam Leith, “Where the profound meets the profane”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 37: 
      Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths.
  2. (sentence adverb) Used to reduce the force of an imperative; simply.
    Just follow the directions on the box.
  3. (speech act) Used to convey a less serious or formal tone
    I just called to say "hi".
  4. (speech act) Used to show humility.
    Lord, we just want to thank You and praise Your Name.
  5. Moments ago, recently.
    They just left, but you may leave a message at the desk.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room [] and came back with a salt mackerel [] . Next he put the mackerel in a fry-pan, and the shanty began to smell like a Banks boat just in from a v'yage.
  6. By a narrow margin; closely; nearly.
    The fastball just missed my head!
    The piece just might fit.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, The China Governess[1]:
      Nanny Broome was looking up at the outer wall.  Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime.
  7. Exactly, perfectly.
    He wants everything just right for the big day.
  8. Precisely.
    • John Dryden
      And having just enough, not covet more.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      The god Pan guided my hand just to the heart of the beast.
    • William Shakespeare
      To-night, at Herne's oak, just 'twixt twelve and one.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70: 
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Variation of joust, presumably ultimately from Latin iuxta 'near, besides'.

Noun[edit]

just (plural justs)

  1. A joust, tournament.

Verb[edit]

just (third-person singular simple present justs, present participle justing, simple past and past participle justed)

  1. To joust, fight a tournament.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairfax to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iūstus.

Adjective[edit]

just m (feminine justa, masculine plural justs or justos, feminine plural justes)

  1. fair; just
  2. perfectly, almost perfectly

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

just

  1. justly

Estonian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

just

  1. exactly, precisely

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iūstus.

Adjective[edit]

just

  1. just, right, correct, proper
  2. exact
  3. adequate
  4. apt

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

just

  1. (archaic) just

Synonyms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

External links[edit]

  • just in Duden online

Latvian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Verb[edit]

just tr., 1st conj., pres. jūtu, jūti, jūt, past jutu

  1. to feel (to perceive with one's sense organs)
    just aukstumu, karstumu, sāpes — to feel cold, heat, pain
    tā, ka nejūt zemi zem kājām — such that s/he doesn't feel the earth under his/her feet (= very fast)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

just

  1. third-person singular past historic of gesir

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French juste.

Adjective[edit]

just

  1. just, correct

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

just

  1. just; quite recently; only moments ago
  2. just; only, simply
  3. exactly, precisely
    Just nu
    Right now (At this precise moment)
    Det var just vad jag ville ha!
    That's exactly what I wanted!