total

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English total, from Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus (all, whole, entire), of unknown origin. Perhaps related to Oscan 𐌕𐌏𐌖𐌕𐌏 (touto, community, city-state), Umbrian 𐌕𐌏𐌕𐌀𐌌 (totam, tribe, acc.), Old English þēod (a nation, people, tribe), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂ (people). More at thede, Dutch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

total (plural totals)

  1. An amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts.
    A total of £145 was raised by the bring-and-buy stall.
  2. (informal, mathematics) Sum.
    The total of 4, 5 and 6 is 15.

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Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

total (comparative more total, superlative most total)

  1. Entire; relating to the whole of something.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
    The total book is rubbish from start to finish.   The total number of votes cast is 3,270.
  2. used as an intensifier Complete; absolute.
    He is a total failure.

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Verb[edit]

total (third-person singular simple present totals, present participle totalling in British English, totaling in American English, simple past and past participle totalled in British English, totaled in American English)

  1. (transitive) To add up; to calculate the sum of.
    When we totalled the takings, we always got a different figure.
  2. To equal a total of; to amount to.
    That totals seven times so far.
  3. (transitive, US, slang) to demolish; to wreck completely. (from total loss)
    Honey, I’m OK, but I’ve totaled the car.
  4. (intransitive) To amount to; to add up to.
    It totals nearly a pound.

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Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French total.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /totaːl/, [tˢoˈtˢæːˀl]

Adjective[edit]

total (neuter totalt, definite and plural totale)

  1. total

Noun[edit]

total c (singular definite totalen, plural indefinite totaler)

  1. total
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compound of to (two) and tal (number).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /total/, [ˈtˢotˢal]

Noun[edit]

total n (singular definite totallet, plural indefinite totaller)

  1. two
Synonyms[edit]
Inflection[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

total m (feminine totale, masculine plural totaux, feminine plural totales)

  1. total
  2. perfect

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

total m (plural totaux)

  1. total

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin tōtālis (total), from Latin tōtus (whole) + -ālis (-al).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

total m, f (plural totais; comparable)

  1. complete; entire (to the greatest extent)
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 141:
      Quero conversar com os senhores e exijo sua total e absoluta atenção.
      I want to talk with you and I demand your complete and absolute attention.
  2. total (relating to the whole of something)
    A quantidade total de livros nesta biblioteca é mais de um milhão.
    The total amount of books in this library is more than a million.

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Noun[edit]

total m (plural totais)

  1. total (amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts)
    O total de livros nesta biblioteca é mais de um milhão.
    The total amount of books in this library is more than a million.

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus (“all, whole, entire).

Adjective[edit]

total m, f (plural totales)

  1. total, complete

Adverb[edit]

total

  1. (colloquial) basically, so, in short (used to summarise)
    Total, que no puedo venir.
    Basically, I can't come.

Noun[edit]

total m (plural totales)

  1. total

See also[edit]