tot

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See also: tôt, tốt, and tót

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot (plural tots)

  1. A small child.
    He learned to run when he was just a tot.
  2. A measure of spirits, especially rum.
    • 1897: Mary H. Kingsley, Travels in West Africa
      Then I give them a tot of rum apiece, as they sit huddled in their blankets.
    • 1916: Siegfried Sassoon, The Working Party
      And tot of rum to send him warm to sleep.
  3. (UK, dialect, dated) A foolish fellow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of total (to sum)

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or IPA then please add some!

Verb[edit]

tot (third-person singular simple present tots, present participle totting, simple past and past participle totted)

  1. To sum or total.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adjective[edit]

tot m (feminine tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totes)

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Chinook Jargon[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. uncle

Coordinate terms[edit]

  • (with regards to gender): kwalh

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. rust, corrosion

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian, Romansch, Occitan, and Catalan tot, Italian tutto, French tout, Spanish and Portuguese todo.

Adjective[edit]

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural toč)

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until), equivalent to toe + te. Compare Old Saxon tōte (to, until), Old Frisian tot (until), Old High German zuo ze.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

tot

  1. until, till
    Ik kan niet wachten tot het hier ook weer gaat sneeuwen! — I can't wait till it snows here as well!

Preposition[edit]

tot

  1. to, up to
  2. until

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German tōt (akin to Old Saxon dōd), from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, English dead, Danish død.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot (not comparable)

  1. dead, deceased

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • tot in Duden online

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot (invariable)

  1. so many

Noun[edit]

tot m (invariable)

  1. so much

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From totus.

Numeral[edit]

tot

  1. so many

Occitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adjective[edit]

tot m (feminine tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totas)

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin totus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot

  1. all

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tot

  1. all; completely

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *daudaz, whence also Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (dauþs), Old Saxon dōd, Old English dēad and Old Norse dauðr.

Adjective[edit]

tōt

  1. dead

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romagnol[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everyone

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus. Compare Aromanian tut, Catalan tot, French tout, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Spanish todo.

Adjective[edit]

tot 4 nom/acc forms

  1. all, (the) whole
  2. (in the plural) all, every

Declension[edit]

singular plural
masculine & neuter feminine masculine feminine & neuter
tot toată toți toate

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) tut
  • (Puter, Vallader) tuot

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adverb[edit]

tot

  1. (Surmiran) all

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adjective[edit]

tot

  1. all