sic

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

Adverb[edit]

sic (not comparable)

  1. thus; thus written
Usage notes[edit]

The word sic may be used in brackets to show that an uncommon or archaic usage is reported faithfully: for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:

The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker ...

It may also be used to highlight a perceived error, sometimes for the purpose of ridicule, as in this example from The Times:

Warehouse has been around for 30 years and has 263 stores, suggesting a large fan base. The chain sums up its appeal thus: "styley [sic], confident, sexy, glamorous, edgy, clean and individual, with it's [sic] finger on the fashion pulse."[1]

Since it is not an abbreviation, it does not require a following period.

Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. To mark with a bracketed sic.[2]
    E. Belfort Bax wrote "... the modern reviewer's taste is not really shocked by half the things he sics or otherwise castigates."[2][3]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of seek.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sic (third-person singular simple present sics, present participle siccing, simple past and past participle sicced)

  1. (transitive) To incite an attack by, especially a dog or dogs.
    He sicced his dog on me!
  2. (transitive) To set upon; to chase; to attack.
    Sic 'em, Mitzi.
Usage notes[edit]
  • The sense of "set upon" is most commonly used as an imperative, in a command to an animal.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ashworth, Anne, "Chain reaction: Warehouse", The Times, 2006-06-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "sic, adv. (and n.)" Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition 1989. Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ E. Belfort Bax. On Some Forms of Modern Cant. Commonweal: 7 May 1887. Marxists’ Internet Archive: 14 Jan. 2006

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sīc (thus, so).

Adverb[edit]

sic

  1. sic

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *so (this, that), same source as Old English sio (she).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sīc (not comparable)

  1. thus, so, just like that
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.
  2. yet

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sic

  1. rafsi of stici.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sic (not comparable)

  1. such

Pronoun[edit]

sic

  1. such

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Upper German Sitz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȉc m (Cyrillic spelling си̏ц)

  1. (regional) seat (of a vehicle)

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • sic” in Hrvatski jezični portal

ca:sic de:sic et:sic el:sic es:sic fr:sic ko:sic is:sic it:sic ku:sic lt:sic li:sic hu:sic mg:sic my:sic fj:sic nl:sic no:sic pl:sic ro:sic sk:sic sh:sic fi:sic sv:sic chr:sic tr:sic vi:sic zh:sic