wind

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English wind (wind), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Swedish vind, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, perhaps Albanian bundë (strong damp wind); ultimately probably cognate with weather.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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wind (countable and uncountable, plural winds)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.
    The wind blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.
    As they accelerated onto the motorway, the wind tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.
    The winds in Chicago are fierce.
    • 2013 June 29, “Unspontaneous combustion”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 29: 
      Since the mid-1980s, when Indonesia first began to clear its bountiful forests on an industrial scale in favour of lucrative palm-oil plantations, “haze” has become an almost annual occurrence in South-East Asia. The cheapest way to clear logged woodland is to burn it, producing an acrid cloud of foul white smoke that, carried by the wind, can cover hundreds, or even thousands, of square miles.
  2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.
    the wind of a cannon ball;  the wind of a bellows
  3. (countable, uncountable) The ability to exert oneself without feeling short of breath.
    After the second lap he was already out of wind.
    Give me a minute before we jog the next mile — I need a second wind.
    • Shakespeare
      If my wind were but long enough to say my prayers, I would repent.
  4. news of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip - used with catch often in past tense
    Steve caught wind of Martha's dalliance with his best friend.
  5. (India and Japan) One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).
  6. (uncountable, colloquial) Flatus.
    Eww. Someone just passed wind.
  7. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
    • John Dryden
      Their instruments were various in their kind, / Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.
  8. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the "four winds".
    • Bible, Ezekiel xxxvii. 9
      Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      When this conversation was repeated in detail within the hearing of the young woman in question, and undoubtedly for his benefit, Mr. Trevor threw shame to the winds and scandalized the Misses Brewster then and there by proclaiming his father to have been a country storekeeper.
  9. A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
  10. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
    • John Milton
      Nor think thou with wind / Of airy threats to awe.
  11. A bird, the dotterel.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle winded)

  1. (transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.
    • 1913, Edith Constance Holme, Crump Folk Going Home, page 136:
      Something higher must lie at the back of that eager response to pack-music and winded horn — something born of the smell of the good earth
  2. (transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen.
    The boxer was winded during round two.
  3. (reflexive) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath.
    I can’t run another step — I’m winded.
  4. (UK) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.
  5. (transitive) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
  6. (transitive) To perceive or follow by scent.
    The hounds winded the game.
  7. (transitive) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English winden, from Old English windan, ƿindan, from Proto-Germanic *windaną. Compare West Frisian wine, Low German winden, Dutch winden, German winden, Danish vinde. See also the related term wend.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle wound or (archaic) winded)

  1. (transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.
    to wind thread on a spool or into a ball
    • Milton
      Whether to wind / The woodbine round this arbour.
  2. (transitive) To tighten the spring of the clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.
    Please wind that old-fashioned alarm clock.
  3. To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.
    • Shakespeare
      Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms.
  4. (ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight.
    Vines wind round a pole.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      He therefore turned him to the steep and rocky path which [] winded through the thickets of wild boxwood and other low aromatic shrubs.
    • Gray
      The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.
    • 1969, Paul McCartney
      The long and winding road / That leads to your door / Will never disappear.
    The river winds through the plain.
  5. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.
    • Shakespeare
      to turn and wind a fiery Pegasus
    • Herrick
      Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please / And wind all other witnesses.
    • Addison
      Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.
  6. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
    • Shakespeare
      You have contrived [] to wind / Yourself into a power tyrannical.
    • Government of Tongues
      little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse
  7. To cover or surround with something coiled about.
    to wind a rope with twine
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

Noun[edit]

wind (plural winds)

  1. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *wind, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Compare German Wind, English wind, West Frisian wyn, Danish vind.

Noun[edit]

wind m (plural winden, diminutive windje n)

  1. wind (movement of air)
    De wind waait door de bomen. — The wind blows through the trees.
  2. flatulence, fart (not informal)
Synonyms[edit]
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Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

wind

  1. first-person singular present indicative of winden
  2. imperative of winden

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), the present participle of *h₂weh₁- (blow, gust). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian wind, Old Saxon wind, Dutch wind, Old High German wint (German Wind), Old Norse vindr (Swedish vind), Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍃 (winds). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin ventus (French vent), Welsh gwynt, Tocharian A want, Tocharian B yente.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wind m

  1. wind
  2. flatulence

Derived terms[edit]