gust

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Apparently from Old Norse gustr, though not recorded before Shakespeare.

Noun[edit]

gust (plural gusts)

  1. A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  2. Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
  • (strong, abrupt rush of wind): windflaw
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (intransitive) To blow in gusts.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin gustus ‘taste’. For the verb, compare Latin gustare, Italian gustare, Spanish gustar.

Noun[edit]

gust (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  2. Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
    • Alexander Pope
      Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust.
    • 1942: ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn gust. — Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  3. Intellectual taste; fancy.
    • Dryden
      A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.

Verb[edit]

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To taste.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To have a relish for.
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gustus.

Noun[edit]

gust m (plural gusts or gustos)

  1. taste

Derived terms[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gustus.

Noun[edit]

gust m (plural gusts)

  1. relish, zest, enjoyment
  2. taste

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin gustus, from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus.

Noun[edit]

gust n (plural gusturi)

  1. taste
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Latin (mensis) augustus (through the Vulgar Latin form agustus).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gust ?

  1. (popular, rare) August
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gǫstъ.

Adjective[edit]

gȗst (definite gȗstī, comparative gȕšćī, Cyrillic spelling гу̑ст)

  1. dense

Declension[edit]