dense

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English[edit]

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French dense, from Latin densus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dense (comparative denser, superlative densest)

  1. Having relatively high density.
  2. Compact; crowded together.
  3. Thick; difficult to penetrate.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them.
  4. Opaque; allowing little light to pass through.
  5. Obscure, or difficult to understand.
  6. (mathematics, topology) Being a subset of a topological space that approximates the space well. See Wikipedia article on dense sets for mathematical definition.
  7. Of a person, slow to comprehend; of low intelligence.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin densus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dense (masculine and feminine, plural denses)

  1. dense

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dense

  1. feminine plural of denso

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From densus (close, crowded, dense).

Adverb[edit]

densē (comparative densius, superlative densissimē)

  1. closely, in rapid succession

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dense

  1. Compound of the second-person plural (ustedes) imperative form of dar, den and the pronoun se.