sad

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See also: SAD, säd, sąd, and sáð

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (sated with, weary of, satiated, filled, full), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (sated, satisfied), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy). Cognate with West Frisian sêd, Dutch zat (sated, drunk), German satt (well-fed, full), Danish sat, Norwegian sad, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌸𐍃 (saþs, full, satisfied), and through Indo-European, with Latin satur (well-fed, sated). Related to sate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. (obsolete) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  2. (obsolete) Steadfast, valiant.
  3. (obsolete) Dignified, serious, grave.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.xi:
      Vprose Sir Guyon, in bright armour clad, / And to his purposd iourney him prepar'd: / With him the Palmer eke in habit sad, / Him selfe addrest to that aduenture hard []
    • Francis Bacon
      ripe and sad courage
    • Ld. Berners
      which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both parties
  4. (obsolete) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
    • I. Taylor
      Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.
  5. Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, II.5:
      this is either used crude, and called Sulphur Vive, and is of a sadder colour; or after depuration, such as we have in magdeleons of rolls, of a lighter yellow.
    • Walton
      sad-coloured clothes
    • Mortimer
      Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of all sad colours.
  6. Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
    She gets sad when he's away.
    • Shakespeare
      First were we sad, fearing you would not come; / Now sadder, that you come so unprovided.
    • Milton
      The angelic guards ascended, mute and sad.
  7. Appearing sorrowful.
    The puppy had a sad little face.
  8. Causing sorrow; lamentable.
    • The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad,
    • G. K. Chesterton
      For, all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, The China Governess[1]:
      The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    It's a sad fact that most rapes go unreported.
  9. Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.127:
      Heaven knows what cash he got, or blood he spilt, / A sad old fellow was he, if you please [...].
    That's the saddest-looking pickup truck I've ever seen.
  10. (slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
    I can't believe you use drugs; you're so sad!
  11. (dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  12. (obsolete) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
    sad bread
    • Spenser
      his hand, more sad than lump of lead
    • Mortimer
      Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m

  1. orchard

Derived terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sad

  1. past tense of sidde

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sad

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐌳

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sad

  1. rafsi of snada.

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy). Cognate with Old English sæd (English sad, Old Frisian sed, Dutch zat, Old High German sat (German satt), Old Norse saðr (Danish sat), Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌸𐍃 (saþs).

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadoro, superlative sadost)

  1. full, sated, satiated
  2. weary

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German sat

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

sad m

  1. orchard

Declension[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English sæd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. grave, serious
  2. strange, remarkable
  3. sad

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sьda, *sьgoda.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sȁd (Cyrillic spelling са̏д)

  1. now
  2. currently
  3. presently

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *saditi (to plant).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃd m (Cyrillic spelling са̑д)

  1. plantation nursery
  2. a young plant from a plantation nursery
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m (genitive singular sadu, nominative plural sady)

  1. garden, orchard, plantation

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sád m inan (genitive sadú or sáda, nominative plural sadôvi or sádi)

  1. fruit

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.