bad

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See also: Bad, bád, bað, and båd

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bad, badde (wicked, evil, depraved), probably a shortening of Old English bæddel (hermaphrodite) (compare English much, wench, from Old English myċel, wenċel), from bædan (to defile), from Proto-Germanic *bad- (compare Old High German pad (hermaphrodite)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoidʰ- (compare Welsh baedd (wild boar), Latin foedus (foul, filthy), foedō (to defile, pollute)).

Adjective[edit]

bad (comparative worse or badder, superlative worst or baddest)

  1. Not good; unfavorable; negative.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
    You have bad credit.
  2. Seemingly non-appropriate, in manners, etc.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      “[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”
    It is bad manners to talk with your mouth full.
  3. Not suitable or fitting.
    Do you think it is a bad idea to confront him directly?
  4. Tricky; stressful; unpleasant.
    Divorce is usually a bad experience for everybody involved.
  5. Evil; wicked.
    Be careful. There are bad people in the world.
  6. Faulty; not functional.
    I had a bad headlight.
  7. (of food) Spoiled, rotten, overripe.
    These apples have gone bad.
  8. (of breath) Malodorous, foul.
    Bad breath is not pleasant for anyone.
  9. (informal) Bold and daring.
  10. (of a need or want) Severe, urgent.
    He is in bad need of a haircut.
Usage notes[edit]

If a person says a food (such as chocolate-covered lard) is "bad for you", that person usually means that the food is "unhealthy". Some foods (such as grapes) are bad for dogs (meaning they are unhealthful for dogs) but not bad for humans. Non-foods can also be "bad for you": eating arsenic is bad for you, and smoking cigarettes is also bad for you.

The comparative badder and superlative baddest are nonstandard usage.

Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
See also[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adverb[edit]

bad (comparative worse, superlative worst)

  1. (now colloquial) Badly.
    I didn't do too bad in the last exam.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad (uncountable)

  1. (slang) error, mistake
    Sorry, my bad!
    • 1993, Mitch Albom, Fab five: basketball, trash talk, the American dream[1], page days:
      "My bad, My bad!” Juwan yelled, scowling
    • 2003, Zane, Skyscraper, page 7:
      “Chico, you're late again.” I turned around and stared him in his beady eyes. “I missed my bus. My bad, Donald.” “Your bad? Your bad? What kind of English is that?
    • 2008, Camika Spencer, Cubicles, page 68:
      Teresa broke out in laughter. “Dang, I sound like I'm talking to my man.” “I tried your cell phone, but you didn't answer.” “I left it at home, Friday. My bad.” “Yeah, your bad.” I laughed. “Really, I'm sorry. It won't happen again.
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. (countable, uncountable, economics) An item (or kind of item) of merchandise with negative value; an unwanted good.
    • 2011, Henry Thompson, International Economics: Global Markets and Competition, edition 3rd, World Scientific, page 97:
      Imports are an economic good but exports an economic bad. Exports must be produced but are enjoyed by foreign consumers.
    • 2011, William J. Boyes, Michael Melvin, Economics, edition 9th, Cengage Learning, page 4:
      An economic bad is anything that you would pay to get rid of. It is not so hard to think of examples of bads: pollution, garbage, and disease fit the description.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably identical to bad, etymology 1, above, especially in the sense "bold, daring".

Adjective[edit]

bad (comparative badder, superlative baddest)

  1. (Should we move(+) this sense?) (slang) Fantastic.
    You is [sic] bad, man!
    Also Bek is "bad" at Madden.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English bad, from Old English bæd, first and third-person singular indicative past tense of biddan (to ask).

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. (archaic) Alternative past tense of bid. See bade.

Etymology 4[edit]

Unknown

Verb[edit]

bad (third-person singular simple present bads, present participle badding, simple past and past participle badded)

  1. (UK, dialect, transitive) To shell (a walnut).
    • 1876, The Gloucester Journal, Oct. 7, 1876, reported in William John Thomas, Doran (John), Henry Frederick Turle, Joseph Knight, Vernon Horace Rendall, Florence Hayllar, Notes and Queries, page 346
      A curious specimen of Gloucestershire dialect c»me out in an assault case heard by the Gloucester court magistrates on Saturday. One of the witnesses, speaking of what a girl was doing at the time the assault took place, said she was ' badding ' walnuts in a pigstye. The word is peculiarly provincial : to ' bad ' walnuts is to strip away the husk. The walnut, too, is often called » 'bannut,' and hence the old Gloucestershire phrase, ' Come an' bad the bannuts.'

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bað.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad n (singular definite badet, plural indefinite bade)

  1. bath, shower, swim
  2. bathroom
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See bede (to pray, request).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /baːd/, [bæːˀð]

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. past tense of bede

Etymology 3[edit]

See bade (to bathe, bath).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /baːd/, [bæðˀ]

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. Imperative of bade.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *bath, from Proto-Germanic *baþą.

Noun[edit]

bad n (plural baden, diminutive badje n)

  1. bath
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. singular past indicative of bidden



Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

bad

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌳

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bad

  1. rafsi of bandu.

Norwegian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad

  1. bath

Inflection[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bād

  1. first-person singular preterite of bīdan
  2. third-person singular preterite of bīdan

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. third-person singular past subjunctive of is
  2. third-person singular imperative of is
  3. second-person plural imperative of is

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Bad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad m

  1. health resort, bath

Synonyms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • bad” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad m (genitive baid, plural badan)

  1. place, spot
  2. tuft, bunch
  3. flock, group
  4. thicket, clump (of trees)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad n

  1. a bath, the act of bathing
  2. a bath, a place for bathing (badplats, badhus)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bad

  1. past tense of be.
  2. past tense of bedja.

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

bad (plural bads)

  1. evil, badness

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]