bad money drives out good

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Traditional sentiment, both in literal and metaphorical sense, dating to ancient works such as Aristophanes' The Frogs, and appearing in various forms in various Islamic and European medieval texts.[1]

In English, termed Gresham's law since 1858 (coinage by Henry Dunning Macleod).

Proverb[edit]

bad money drives out good

  1. Debased coinage (with low levels of precious metals) replaces purer coinage (with higher levels of precious metals).
  2. (metaphorically) Mediocre talent drives away real talent.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Selgin, G., University of Georgia (2003). Gresham's Law.