bet

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See also: BET, bèt, and Bet

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From 16th century criminal slang, likely from abet or Old English bætan (to make better).

Noun[edit]

bet (plural bets)

  1. A wager, an agreement between two parties that a stake (usually money) will be paid by the loser to the winner (the winner being the one who correctly forecast the outcome of an event).
    Dylan owes Fletcher $30 from an unsuccessful bet.
  2. A degree of certainty.
    It’s a safe bet that it will rain tomorrow.
    It’s an even bet that Jim will come top of the maths test tomorrow
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

bet (third-person singular simple present bets, present participle betting, simple past and past participle bet or betted)

  1. To stake or pledge upon the outcome of an event; to wager.
    • Shakespeare
      John a Gaunt loved him well, and betted much money on his head.
    • O. W. Holmes
      I'll bet you two to one I'll make him do it.
  2. To be sure of something; to be able to count on something.
    You bet!
  3. (poker) To place money into the pot in order to require others do the same, usually only used for the first person to place money in the pot on each round.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hebrew בית (béyt)

Noun[edit]

bet

  1. Alternative form of beth.

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

bet

  1. (knitting) between
    • 1998, Kristin Nicholas, Knitting the New Classics (page 63)
      insert right-hand needle bet 2 sts just knitted

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

bet

  1. face
  2. side, direction
  3. page

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside, without) (whence also Latvian preposition bez, q.v.), to which an old particle -t was added, visible also in the Latvian particle it and the adverb šeit (here) (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian bèt, Sudovian bat.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

bet

  1. adversative conjunction, used to express contrast or opposition; but
    istaba bija maza, bet mājīga — the room was small but cozy
    komandiera īsais, bet atlētiskais augums veidoja neskaidru siluetu — the commander's short but athletic body (lit. size) made an unclear, vague silhouette
  2. (with tomēr) expressing contrast, opposition with a nuance of concession; yet, but still
    stiprs un izturīgs, bet tomēr tāds kā paviegls, likās, visvairāk tikai aiz lielības Martiņš te skrēja — strong and enduring, yet somewhat light; it seemed that Martiņš was running there rather because of posturing (= to be able to boast about it)
  3. (with gan) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but, but instead
    tur nestāvēja rakstāmgaldi, bet gan parasti virtuves galdi ar vienu atvilktni — the desks weren't there, but instead simple kitchen tables with (only) one drawer
    Šellija Prometejs neienīst savu mocītāju Jupiteru, bet gan sirsnīgi nožēlo — Shelley's Prometheus does not hate his tormentor Jupiter, but instead sincerely regrets (what he did)
  4. (with ne, nevis) expressing strong contrast, opposition; but not
    atnāca Jānis, bet nevis Pēteris — Jānis came, but not Pēteris
    etiķim jābūt dzidram, skābam, bet ne asam, kodīgam — vinegar must be clear, acid, but not sharp, harsh (= ‘biting’)
  5. (with a preceding negative clause) (expressing strong contrast, opposition)
    tas, kas neredzams sēž uz soliņa man līdzās, nav Roberts, bet Harijs — the one sitting invisibly on the bench near me is not Roberts, but Harijs
    vīnu apkārt dodama, viņa nenolaida acu, bet skatījās katram taisni sējā — (while) giving wine around, she did not lower her eyes, but (instead) looked straight in the face of every one (of them)
    ne atpakaļ, bet uz priekšu iet mūsu dzīves gaita! — not backward, but forward our life's pace goes!
    automobilis brauca nevis pa lielceļu, bet taisni pa meža ceļu — the car did not go on the highway, but straight along the forest road
  6. (with gan in the preceding sentence) expressing opposition to the preceding event, which did not achieve its goal, was frustrated (indeed) ... but
    Sīmanis gan mantu novēlēja, bet mir nenomira — Sīmanis did indeed want the property, but die, he didn't (= he did not go as far as dying for it)
    rokas gan pieķēris ratu malai, bet neparko nevarēja attrāpīt ass galu — (his) hands did (manage to) catch the edge of the wheel, but couldn't reach the end of the axle
  7. used to express an inconsistency or contradiction between two clauses, or a frustrated expectation
    lietus beidzot pārgājis, bet saules nav — the rain has finally passed, but there is no sun
    meitenes bārienu gaida, bet štāba priekšnieks smaida... — the girls were expecting a scolding, but the chief of staff smiled...
    Jānis Bruzils juta, ka viena acs tam pamazām aiztūkst un apmiglo kā ar sarkanu miglu, bet toties otra kļūst arvien skaidrāka — Jānis Bruzils felt that one eye was slowly swelling and becoming covered with a red mist, but in contrast the other was becoming clearer and clearer
  8. used to connect a sentence to the preceding context, indicating an inconsistency or contradiction, or a frustrated expectation; But...
    Līzei bija bezgala žēl izmocītās jaunās sievas. Bet nu bija jāiet iekšā un jārunājas ar citiem — Līze was infinitely sorry for the exhausted young woman. But she had to go in and talk to others.
    pēc svētkiem Kārlēns aizgāja un solījās pārnākt atkal rudenī. Bet nepārnāca ne rudenī, ne pavasarī... — after the festivities Kārlēns went (away), promising to stay there again next fall. But he didn't come neither next fall, nor next spring...
  9. used to connect a subordinate clause indicating concession to a main clause; but
    lai kāds dzērājs Vanags, bet ataugu viņš taupīja, ragavām ilksi, pat to viņš neļāva nocirst savā mežā — that Vanags may be a drunkard, but he conserved the (new) forest growth, sleigh lumber (= wood for making sleighs), he didn't let it be cut in his forest
  10. (in combinations like ne vien ..., bet arī, ne tikai ..., bet arī, ne tikvien ..., bet arī) used to coordinate clause elements; not only ..., but also
    riekstu eļļa noder ne vien uzturam, bet arī parfimērijas un laku pagatavošanai — hazelnut oil is useful not only for consumption, but also for perfume and varnish producers
    Nikolajs Sņegovs bija ļoti aizrāvies ne tikai ar matemātiku, bet arī ar seno laiku vēsturi — Nikolajs Sņegovs was very fascinated not only by mathematics, but also by ancient history
  11. (with tad) used to strengthen emotionally the idea expressed in a sentence as opposed to some expectation but...!, but then...!
    bet tad nosēts linu lauks, bez vienas svītrinas, kā ar palagu noklāts!but then the flax field was (fully) strewn, as if covered with a blanket
    bet tad ir gan milzenis akmens!but that is a giant stone!
  12. (used as a noun) obstacle, hindrance, “but
    šim pasākumam ir savs “bet” — this undertaking has its own but (= there is an obstacle to it)
    tas jau slikti nebūtu, sieviņ, bet ir viens bet — that wouldn't be bad, wifey, but there is one “but”...

Usage notes[edit]

Latvian bet is to some extent a "false friend" of English but, since it is used not only in adversative (but) contexts, but also in certain additive (and) contexts, when there is the idea of contrast (while...) between two situations, very much like Russian а (a): es strādāju, bet mana sieva lasa grāmatu “I am working, and (= while) my wife is reading a book” (cf. Russian я работаю, а моя жена читает книгу). A more strongly adversative word, used to stress contrast, contradiction, or inconsistency, is taču, which would correspond to Russian но (no).

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “bet” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Lithuanian[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *bet, from Proto-Indo-European *be, *bʰe (outside, without) to which an old particle -t was added. Cognates include Latvian bet, Sudovian bat.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

bèt

  1. but

References[edit]

  1. ^ “bet” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bet

  1. rafsi of betri.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch bit.

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “Is this bi+met?”

Preposition[edit]

bet

  1. with, together with
  2. with, by means of, using
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bet

  1. Alternative form of bat.

Etymology 3[edit]

From bi + te. Compare Middle High German biz (German bis).

Preposition[edit]

bet

  1. (rare) up to

Norwegian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bet

  1. past tense of bite

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Adverb[edit]

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

·bet

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive conjunct of at·tá

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Adverb[edit]

bet

  1. better
  2. rather

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bet f

  1. beth; the Hebrew letter ב

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bet

  1. past tense of bita.

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English bed

Noun[edit]

bet

  1. bed.

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

bet (plural bets)

  1. flower bed

Declension[edit]