absurd

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1557. From Middle French absurde, from Latin absurdus (incongruous, dissonant, out of tune),[1] from ab (away from, out) + surdus (silent, deaf, dull-sounding).[2] Compare surd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (comparative absurder or more absurd, superlative absurdest or most absurd)

  1. Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and flatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; silly. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][3]
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I, V-iv
      This proffer is absurd and reasonless.
    • ca. 1710, Alexander Pope
      This phrase absurd to call a villain great
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 17, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “Perhaps it is because I have been excommunicated. It's absurd, but I feel like the Jackdaw of Rheims.” ¶ She winced and bowed her head. Each time that he spoke flippantly of the Church he caused her pain.
  2. (obsolete) Inharmonious; dissonant. [Attested only in the early 17th century.][3]
  3. Having no rational or orderly relationship to people's lives; meaningless; lacking order or value.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Adults have condemned them to live in what must seem like an absurd universe. - Joseph Featherstone
  4. Dealing with absurdism.

Usage notes[edit]

  • More and most absurd are the preferred or more common form of the comparable, as opposed to absurder and absurdest.
  • Among the synonyms:
    • Irrational is the weakest, denoting that which is plainly inconsistent with the dictates of sound reason; as, an irrational course of life.
    • Foolish rises higher, and implies either a perversion of that faculty, or an absolute weakness or fatuity of mind; as, foolish enterprises.
    • Absurd rises still higher, denoting that which is plainly opposed to received notions of propriety and truth; as, an absurd man, project, opinion, story, argument, etc.
    • Preposterous rises still higher, and supposes an absolute inversion in the order of things; or, in plain terms, a "putting of the cart before the horse;" as, a preposterous suggestion, preposterous conduct, a preposterous regulation or law.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd (plural absurds)

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Wikipedia

  1. (obsolete) An absurdity. [Attested from the early 17th century until the mid 17th century.][3]
  2. (philosophy) The opposition between the human search for meaning in life and the inability to find any; the state or condition in which man exists in an irrational universe and his life has no meaning outside of his existence. [First attested in the early 20th century.][3]

Usage notes[edit]

  • (philosophy): Absurd is sometimes preceded by the word the.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurence Urdang (editor), The Random House College Dictionary (Random House, 1984 [1975], ISBN 0-394-43600-8), page 7
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 8
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 2003 [1933], Lesley Brown editor, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, edition 5th, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7, page 10:

Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd m (feminine absurda, masculine plural absurds, feminine plural absurdes)

  1. absurd

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m (plural absurds)

  1. absurdity

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absurdus (discordant, unreasonable).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absurd/, [ɑbˈsuɐ̯ˀd̥]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (neuter absurd, definite and plural absurde)

  1. absurd
  2. (adverbial) absurdly

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd (comparative absurder, superlative am absurdesten)

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absurd m

  1. nonsense
    Jego propozycje to jeden wielki absurd.
    His suggestions are one big load of nonsense.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • absurd” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absurd

  1. absurd

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]