dire

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See also: diré

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dirus (fearful, ominous).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dire (comparative direr or more dire, superlative direst or most dire)

  1. Warning of bad consequences: ill-boding; portentous.
    dire omens
  2. Requiring action to prevent bad consequences: urgent, pressing.
    dire need
    • 2014 June 14, “It's a gas”, The Economist, volume 411, number 8891: 
      One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. [] But out of sight is out of mind. And that, together with the inherent yuckiness of the subject, means that many old sewers have been neglected and are in dire need of repair.
  3. Expressing bad consequences: dreadful; dismal; horrible; terrible; lamentable.
    dire consequences;  to be in dire straits
  4. (informal) Bad in quality, awful, terrible.
    • 2011 December 10, Arindam Rej, “Norwich 4-2 Newcastle”, BBC Sport:
      A second Norwich goal in four minutes arrived after some dire Newcastle defending. Gosling gave the ball away with a sloppy back-pass, allowing Crofts to curl in a cross that the unmarked Morison powered in with a firm, 12-yard header.

Quotations[edit]

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Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say, to tell

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dire m (plural dires)

  1. saying (that which is said)
  2. belief, opinion

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to say, tell
  2. (transitive, intransitive) to recite
  3. (transitive, intransitive) to mean
  4. (transitive, intransitive) to think
  5. (transitive, intransitive) to admit

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dīre

  1. vocative masculine singular of dīrus

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say (express using language)

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal dir, from Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say (express using language)
  2. to mean; to signify

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. (chiefly intransitive) to say
  2. (transitive) to recount (a story)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dire, from Latin dīcō, dīcere.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say