dir

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See also: Dir, Dir., dir-, and dír-

English[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

dir

  1. direct
  2. direction
  3. (computing) directory

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin īre, present active infinitive of ; the forms beginning with V from corresponding forms of vādō; the forms beginning with F from the corresponding forms of sum.

Verb[edit]

dir

  1. to go

Breton[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dir m

  1. steel

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal dir, from Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dir (first-person singular present dic, past participle dit)

  1. to say

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /diːɐ̯/
  • (colloquially in unstressed position) IPA(key): /dɐ/

Pronoun[edit]

dir

  1. (personal) dative of du; you, to you.
  2. (reflexive) dative; yourself, to yourself.

External links[edit]

  • dir in Duden online

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

dir

  1. apocopic form of dire

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dir

  1. rafsi of dicra.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronoun[edit]

dir

  1. second-person singular, dative: you
    Ech hunn dir e Geschenk geschéckt
    I have sent you a present
  2. second-person plural, nominative: you

Declension[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dir

  1. to say
Descendants[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dūrus.

Adjective[edit]

dir m (feminine dira, masculine plural dirs, feminine plural diras)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Rumantsch Grischun) hard
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Surmiran) deir
  • (Puter, Vallader) dür

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dīcō, dīcere, from Proto-Indo-European *deyḱ- (to show, point out).

Verb[edit]

dir

  1. to say
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) dir
  • (Sutsilvan) gir
  • (Surmiran) deir

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

dir m (plural dirs)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) liver
Alternative forms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Tolai[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dir

  1. Third-person dual pronoun: they two, them two

Declension[edit]



Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere (compare Italian dire), present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dir

  1. (transitive) to say, tell
  2. (transitive) to affirm

Conjugation[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

dir

  1. soft mutation of tir (land)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tir dir nhir thir