dor

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dorre, dore, from Old English dora (humming insect), from Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect), from Proto-Indo-European *dher-, *dhrēn- (bee, hornet, drone). Related to Middle Low German dorne (bumblebee), Middle Dutch dorne (bumblebee), Dutch dar (drone), Old English drān (drone). More at drone.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dor (plural dors)

  1. A large European dung beetle, Geotrupes stercorarius, that makes a droning noise while flying.
  2. Any flying insect which makes a loud humming noise, such as the June bug or a bumblebee.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare dor (a beetle), and hum, humbug.

Noun[edit]

dor (plural dors)

  1. (obsolete) A trick, joke, or deception.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaumont & Fletcher to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dor (attributive dorre, comparative dorder, superlative dorste)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin doleō. Compare Daco-Romanian durea.

Verb[edit]

dor (past participle durutã)

  1. I hurt, ache.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dolus. Compare Daco-Romanian dor.

Noun[edit]

dor

  1. longing, desire, want
  2. love
  3. passion
See also[edit]

Breton[edit]

Noun[edit]

dor

  1. door

Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dor m (plural dorow)

  1. ground, earth

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *thurri, from Proto-Germanic *þursuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dor (comparative dorder, superlative dorst)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

Declension[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolor, dolōris.

Noun[edit]

dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dor

  1. rafsi of donri.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *durą. Cognate with Old Saxon dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old English duru, German Tür). Indo-European cognates include Greek θυρα (thyra), Latin foris, Lithuanian dùrys, Old Church Slavonic двьрь (dvĭrĭ) (Russian дверь (dverʹ)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dor n

  1. a large door, a gate

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *durą. Cognate with Old English dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old Saxon duru, German Tür).

Noun[edit]

dor n

  1. a gate, a large door

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese door (pain), from Latin dolor, dolōris, from Old Latin *dolhos, from Proto-Indo-European verbal root *delh (to hew, to split).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain

Related terms[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

dor

  1. price

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolus. [1]

Noun[edit]

dor n (plural doruri)

  1. longing

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Romanian Explanatory Dictionary http://dexonline.ro/definitie/dor

Tolai[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dor

  1. First-person inclusive dual pronoun: you (singular) and I, you (singular) and me

Declension[edit]