ache

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ake (obsolete)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English aken (verb), and ache (noun), from Old English acan (verb) (from Proto-Germanic *akaną (to be bad, be evil)) and æċe (noun) (from Proto-Germanic *akiz), both from Proto-Indo-European *ag- (sin, crime). Cognate with Low German aken, achen, äken (to hurt, to ache), North Frisian akelig, æklig (terrible, miserable, sharp, intense), West Frisian aaklik (nasty, horrible, dismal, dreary), Dutch akelig (nasty, horrible). The noun was originally pronounced as spelled, with a palatized ch sound (compare batch, from bake); the verb was originally strong, conjugating for tense like take (e.g. I ake, I oke, I have aken), but gradually became weak during Middle English. Historically the verb was spelled ake, and the noun ache. The verb came to be spelled like the noun when Samuel Johnson mistakenly assumed that it derived from Ancient Greek ἄχος (áchos, pain) due to the similarity in form and meaning of the two words.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ache (third-person singular simple present aches, present participle aching, simple past ached or (obsolete) oke, past participle ached or (obsolete) aken)

  1. (intransitive) To suffer pain; to be the source of, or be in, pain, especially continued dull pain; to be distressed.
    • circa 1593, Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene V:
      Fie, how my bones ache!
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The turmoil went on—no rest, no peace. […] It was nearly eleven o'clock now, and he strolled out again. In the little fair created by the costers' barrows the evening only seemed beginning; and the naphtha flares made one's eyes ache, the men's voices grated harshly, and the girls' faces saddened one.
  2. (transitive, literary, rare) To cause someone or something to suffer pain.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ache (plural aches)

  1. Continued dull pain, as distinguished from sudden twinges, or spasmodic pain.
    • circa 1610, Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I, Scene II:
      Fill all thy bones with aches.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French and modern French ache, from Latin apium (celery).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ache (plural aches)

  1. (obsolete) Parsley.

Etymology 3[edit]

Representing the pronunciation of the letter H.

Noun[edit]

ache (plural aches)

  1. (rare) A variant spelling of aitch.

Anagrams[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

ache f (usually uncountable)

  1. wild celery

Synonyms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧che

Verb[edit]

ache

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of achar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of achar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of achar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of achar