eche

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English eche, ece, from Old English ēċe, ǣċe (perpetual, eternal, everlasting), from Proto-Germanic *aiwikjaz, *aiwōkijaz (eternal), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (lifetime). Cognate with Dutch eeuwig (eternal), German ewig (eternal), Swedish evig (perpetual, eternal).

Adjective[edit]

eche (comparative more eche, superlative most eche)

  1. (obsolete) Eternal; everlasting.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English echen (to increase, augment). More at eke.

Verb[edit]

eche (third-person singular simple present eches, present participle eching, simple past and past participle eched)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To increase or enlarge.

Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

eche

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of echar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of echar

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ælc.

Adjective[edit]

eche

  1. each

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

eche

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of echar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of echar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of echar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of echar.