egg

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Eggs in a nest.
An egg being cooked for food.
An Easter egg made of chocolate and caramel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English egge, from Old Norse egg (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg), by Holtzmann's Law from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg). Cognate with Icelandic egg (egg), Norwegian egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg). The native English ey (pl. eyren), akin to Dutch ei (pl. eieren) and German Ei (pl. Eier) and ultimately from the same Proto-Germanic root, survived into the 16th century before being fully replaced by egg. More at ey.

Noun[edit]

egg (plural eggs)

  1. (zoology, countable) An approximately spherical or ellipsoidal body produced by birds, snakes, insects and other animals, housing the embryo during its development.
  2. (countable) The egg of a domestic fowl as an item of food.
  3. (uncountable) The contents of one or more (hen's usually) eggs as a culinary ingredient, etc.
    I also determine the minimal amount of egg required to make good mayonnaise.
  4. (biology, countable) The female primary cell, the ovum.
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3: 
      Many genes with reproductive roles also have antibacterial and immune functions, which indicate that the threat of microbial attack on the sperm or egg may be a major influence on rapid evolution during reproduction.
  5. Anything shaped like an egg, such as an Easter egg or a chocolate egg.
  6. A swelling on one's head, usually large or noticeable, associated with an injury.
  7. (mildly pejorative, slang, ethnic slur), (potentially offensive) A person of Caucasian (Western) ancestry, who has a strong desire to learn about and immerse him- or herself in East Asian culture, and/or such a person who is perceived as behaving as if he or she were Asian (from the "white" outside and "yellow" inside).
  8. (New Zealand, pejorative) A foolish or obnoxious person.
    Shut up, you egg!
  9. In terms such as good egg, bad egg, tough egg etc., a person, fellow.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. To throw eggs at.
  2. To dip in or coat with beaten egg (cooking).
  3. To distort a circular cross-section (as in a tube) to an elliptical or oval shape, either inadvertently or intentionally.
    After I cut the tubing, I found that I had slightly egged it in the vise.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse eggja (to edge).

Verb[edit]

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. (obsolete except in egg on) To encourage, incite.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun[edit]

egg n (genitive singular egs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension[edit]
n23 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggið egg eggini
Accusative egg eggið egg eggini
Dative eggi egginum egg(j)um egg(j)unum
Genitive egs egsins eggja eggjanna
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Old Norse word egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Noun[edit]

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. blade, edge
  2. border, edge of a cliff
Declension[edit]
f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggin eggjar eggjarnar
Accusative egg eggina eggjar eggjarnar
Dative egg eggini eggjum eggjunum
Genitive eggjar eggjarinnar eggja eggjanna

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Cognate with Old English ǣġ (obsolete English ey); Swedish ägg; Old High German ei (German Ei).

Noun[edit]

egg n (genitive singular eggs, nominative plural egg)

  1. (zoology) an egg
  2. an oval shaped object
  3. the ovum
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Cognates include Old Frisian egg, Old Saxon eggia, Dutch egge; Old English ecg (English edge); Old High German egga (German Ecke); Swedish egg.

The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin aciēs (edge, sharpness), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akís, point).

Noun[edit]

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, nominative plural eggjar)

  1. (weaponry) the sharp edge of a knife, sword, or similar
  2. a sharp edge on a mountain
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
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Derived terms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun[edit]

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga or eggene)

  1. an egg
    et kokt egg - a boiled egg

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun[edit]

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga)

  1. an egg

Derived terms[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun[edit]

egg n (genitive eggs, plural egg)

  1. egg

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: æg
  • English: egg (replaced native Old English æġ)
  • Faroese: egg

References[edit]

  • “egg” in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Old Norse word egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

egg c

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]