mine

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See also: Mine

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English mīn.

Pronoun[edit]

mine

  1. My; belonging to me; that which belongs to me.
Usage notes[edit]
  • My and mine are essentially two forms of the same word, with my being used attributively before the noun, and mine being used in all other cases; hence:
    No, that's not my car. (attributive use)
    That car next to it isn't mine, either. (predicative use)
    Mine is the one over there, on the far right. (substantive use)
    Mine for only a week so far, it already feels like an old friend. (absolute use)
  • In archaic use, this word is occasionally used attributively after the noun, in which case the form mine is used:
  • In the above respects, this word is analogous to most of the other possessive pronouns, as well as a number of other noun modifiers, such as lone/alone.
  • Historically, my came to be used only before a consonant sound, and later came to be used regardless of the following sound. Nonetheless, mine still sees archaic pre-vocalic use:
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French mine, from Late Latin mina, from Gaulish (compare to Welsh mwyn, Irish míanach (ore)), from Proto-Celtic *mēnis (ore, metal).

Noun[edit]

mine (plural mines)

Entrance to a gold mine in Victoria, Australia
Cutaway view of an anti-tank landmine
  1. An excavation from which ore or solid minerals are taken, especially one consisting of underground tunnels.
    This diamond comes from a mine in South Africa.
    He came out of the coal mine with a face covered in black.
    Most coal and ore comes from open-pit mines nowadays.
  2. (military) A passage dug toward or underneath enemy lines, which is then packed with explosives.
  3. (military) A device intended to explode when stepped upon or touched, or when approached by a ship, vehicle, or person.
    His left leg was blown off after he stepped on a mine.
    The warship was destroyed by floating mines.
  4. (pyrotechnics) A type of firework that explodes on the ground, shooting sparks upward.
  5. (entomology) The cavity made by a caterpillar while feeding inside a leaf.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mine (third-person singular simple present mines, present participle mining, simple past and past participle mined)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To remove (ore) from the ground.
    Crater of Diamonds State Park is the only place in the world where visitors can mine their own diamonds.
  2. To dig into, for ore or metal.
    • Ure
      Lead veins have been traced [] but they have not been mined.
  3. (transitive) To sow mines (the explosive devices) in (an area).
    We had to slow our advance after the enemy mined the road ahead of us.
  4. (transitive) To damage (a vehicle or ship) with a mine (an explosive device).
  5. (intransitive) To dig a tunnel or hole; to burrow in the earth.
    the mining cony
  6. To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
    • Hayward
      They mined the walls.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Too lazy to cut down these immense trees, the spoilers [] had mined them, and placed a quantity of gunpowder in the cavity.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowing from French.

Noun[edit]

mine (plural mines)

  1. Alternative form of mien

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin , possibly through a root mēne, or through analogy with tsine, from *quene, from quem. Compare Daco-Romanian mine, also Dalmatian main.

Pronoun[edit]

mine

  1. I
  2. me

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Crimean Gothic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mēnô.

Noun[edit]

mine

  1. moon
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Mine. Luna.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /miːnə/, [ˈmiːnə], [ˈmiːn̩]

Noun[edit]

mine c (singular definite minen, plural indefinite miner)

  1. look, air, mien
  2. (military) mine
  3. pit

Inflection[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mine

  1. (possessive) Plural form of min

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Vulgar Latin *mina, from Celtic *meina.

Noun[edit]

mine f (plural mines)

  1. mine (excavation or explosive)
  2. pencil lead

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from Breton min (beak, muzzle).

Noun[edit]

mine f (plural mines)

  1. appearance, physical aspect; expression
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From miner

Verb[edit]

mine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of miner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of miner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of miner
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of miner
  5. second-person singular imperative of miner

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mine

  1. genitive feminine singular of mion
  2. comparative form of mion

Noun[edit]

mine

  1. genitive singular of min

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mine

  1. plural form of mina

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mine

  1. rōmaji reading of みね

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine

Noun[edit]

mine m (definite singular minen, indefinite plural miner, definite plural minene)

  1. mine (excavation or explosive)

Pronoun[edit]

mine plural

  1. plural form of min

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mine m (definite singular minen, indefinite plural minar, definite plural minane)

  1. mine (excavation or explosive)

Pronoun[edit]

mine plural

  1. plural form of min

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

mine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of minar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of minar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of minar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of minar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin , possibly through a root mēne, or through analogy with cine, from *quene, from quem. It also possibly acquired this ending through adopting the common Latin accusative inflection -inem. Compare tine, sine. Compare also Dalmatian main.

Pronoun[edit]

mine (stressed accusative form of eu)

  1. me
    iubești pe mine? - Do you love me?
Related terms[edit]
  • (unstressed form)
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mine

  1. plural form of mină

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mine

  1. mine

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

mine

  1. genitive singular of min

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

mine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of minar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of minar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of minar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of minar.