pe

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Semitic *pay- (mouth).

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

pe

  1. The seventeenth letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and others).

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *petja, from Proto-Indo-European *petino, from *pet 'to spread out, to extend' (cf. English fathom). Alternatively from Latin Latin pannus 'cloth, rag, gamrnet'[1].

Noun[edit]

pe m (indefinite plural penjë, definite singular peri, definite plural penjtë)

  1. thread
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vladimir Orel (2000), A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, Ledien: Brill Academic Publishers, page 313

Annobonese[edit]

Noun[edit]

pe

  1. father

References[edit]

  • 2005, John H. McWhorter, Defining Creole

Breton[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

pe

  1. or

Adjective[edit]

pe (interrogative adjective)

  1. which, what

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

pe f (plural pes)

  1. The Hebrew letter פ (final form ף).
  2. The Latin letter P (lowercase p).

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbreviation of perjantai.

Abbreviation[edit]

pe

  1. perjantai (Friday)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

pe

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter P.

Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Lojban[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

pe

  1. Belonging to or being associated with; of.
    le boxna be fu zi'o be'o pe la daubetcis. cu cinri
    The Daubechies frequency-less wave is interesting.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The cmavo ge'u can be used to indicate the termination of the pe-phrase, but is only required if the parsing of the sentence would otherwise be ambiguous.
  • The cmavo pe can be followed immediately by a sumti tcita in order to have its phrase modify a cmene, as if it were an internal sumti of that cmene.

Related terms[edit]


Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin per.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

pe

  1. for

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Muntenia, informal), pi (Moldova), pre (archaic)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin per, with meaning influenced by super.

Preposition[edit]

pe (+accusative)

  1. on
    cartea este pe masa - The book is on the table.
  2. (no lexical meaning) used to indicate direct object in some cases
    o aștept pe mama - I'm waiting on/for mom.

Usage notes[edit]

Pe takes the accusative case of nouns and is used as the marker for the direct object when said object is:

  • a proper noun; the name of a person or animal
  • a common noun referring to a specific person, generally known to both the speaker and listener
  • a common noun acting as a metaphor for a person
  • a common noun in a construction in which the subject and the direct object are the same noun and they precede the predicate

Pe is not used when the direct object is:

  • a common noun designating inanimate objects or animals
  • a common noun referring to an unspecified person

Related terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) pei
  • (Puter, Vallader)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pēs (foot), from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Noun[edit]

pe m (plural pes or peis)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, anatomy) foot

Usage notes[edit]

In Rumantsch Grischun and Sutsilvan, the plural is pes. In Surmiran, however, it is peis.


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pe f (plural pes)

  1. Name of the letter p.

Tocharian A[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Cf. the nominative/accusative dual form, peṃ, presumably from a Proto-Tocharian dual *peine (whence also Tocharian B nominative/accusative dual form paine), from an earlier *pei, from the Proto-Indo-European dual *póde, from *pṓds. It is from this dual form in Proto-Tocharian that the singular forms have probably been analogically built. Compare Tocharian B paiyye. [1]

Noun[edit]

pe m

  1. foot

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.geocities.ws/protoillyrian/tocharian.html

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pe

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

pe

  1. if
    Pe bawn i'n gyfoethog, teithiwn i o gwmpas y byd — If I were rich, I would travel around the world.