or

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English oþþe.

Conjunction[edit]

or

  1. Connects at least two alternative words, phrases, clauses, sentences, etc. each of which could make a passage true. In English, this is the "inclusive or." The "exclusive or" is formed by "either [] or".
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 5
      The sporophyte foot is also characteristic: it is very broad and more or less lenticular or disciform, as broad or broader than the calyptra stalk [] , and is sessile on the calyptra base []
  2. Logical union of two sets of values. There are two forms, an exclusive or and an inclusive or.
  3. Counts the elements before and after as two possibilities.
  4. Otherwise; a consequence of the condition that the previous is false
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or otherwise his man would be there with a message to say that his master would shortly join me if I would kindly wait.
    It's raining! Come inside or you'll catch a cold!
  5. Connects two equivalent names.
    the country Myanmar or Burma
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French or (yellow), from Latin aurum (gold)

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

or (uncountable)

  1. (heraldry) The gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
    1909, The metals are gold and silver, these being termed "or" and "argent". — Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide to Heraldry
    1889, In engraving, "Or" is expressed by dots. — Charles Norton Elvin, A Dictionary of Heraldry
Synonyms[edit]
  • (gold or yellow tincture): o., Or
Related terms[edit]
  • Au (chemical symbol for gold)
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

or (not comparable)

  1. (heraldry) Of gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Late Old English ār, from Scandinavian (compare Old Norse ár). Compare ere.

Adverb[edit]

or

  1. (obsolete) Early (on).
  2. (obsolete) Earlier, previously.

Preposition[edit]

or

  1. (now archaic or dialect) Before; ere.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VII:
      "Sey ye never so," seyde Sir Bors, "for many tymys or this she hath bene wroth with you, and aftir that she was the firste that repented hit."

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hor (dialectal)
  • ora (dialectal)

Etymology[edit]

1103; variant of hor, from Proto-Basque *hor. Mostly replaced by zakur.

Noun[edit]

or

  1. dog

Synonyms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Chemical element
Au Previous: platí (Pt)
Next: mercuri (Hg)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aurum.

Noun[edit]

or m (plural ors)

  1. gold

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin aurum, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-o- (glow).

Noun[edit]

or m (plural ors)

  1. gold
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin horā, alteration of hac hora.

Adverb[edit]

or

  1. (obsolete) now, presently

Conjunction[edit]

or

  1. yet, however

See also[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French or, Italian ora, or.

Conjunction[edit]

or

  1. yet; however

Italian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

or

  1. apocopic form of ora

Derived terms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

or m (uncountable)

  1. gold (metal)
  2. gold (color)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: or

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ǫlr, órir

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

or f, m (definite singular ora/oren; indefinite plural orer; definite plural orene)

  1. alder

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ór

Preposition[edit]

or

  1. out of

References[edit]

  • “or” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *uz.

Noun[edit]

ōr n

  1. origin

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin aurum.

Noun[edit]

or m (oblique plural ors, nominative singular ors, nominative plural or)

  1. gold (metal)
  2. gold (color)
  3. (by extension) blond(e) color

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

(ele/ei) or (modal auxiliary; third-person plural form of vrea, used with infinitives to form presumptive tenses)

  1. (they) might
    fiindcă or avea ceva pe care noi nu-l avem, va trebui așteptăm puțin
    being that they might have something that we don't, we will need to wait a bit

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) aur
  • (Surmiran) ôr

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aurum.

Noun[edit]

or m

  1. (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) gold

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A variant of ere, obsolete in modern English.

Conjunction[edit]

or

  1. Before or until (only in certain senses)
    It'll nae be lang or A gang ma holiday.- It'll not be long until/ before I go on holiday

Usage notes[edit]

Not archaic, but rare amongst young people.


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from Old Irish amar (song, singing). See òran.

Noun[edit]

or m (genitive ora, plural ora, orthachan, or orrachan)

  1. hymn, incantation, petition, prayer

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

or n

  1. a mite

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Tocharian A[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dóru, with unexplained loss of initial */d/. Compare Tocharian B or.

Noun[edit]

or n

  1. wood

Tocharian B[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dóru, with unexplained loss of initial */d/. Compare Tocharian A or.

Noun[edit]

or n

  1. wood

Related terms[edit]