aut

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Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

aut m (plural auc, feminine auta, feminine plural autes)

  1. high

Latin[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

aut

  1. or
    Marcus ludos videbit aut dormiet.
    Marcus will watch the games or sleep.
    Aut Caesar, aut nihil.
    Either Caesar or nothing (figuratively: all or nothing)
    Aut disce aut discede.
    Either learn or go away.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This word is used in pairs (aut ... aut) to mean "either....or".
  • Unlike vel, this word implies an exclusive "or"; i.e., one option or the other, but not both.
    (see similiar distinction in Polish: "albo" and "lub")

Descendants[edit]

  • Asturian: o
  • Catalan: o
  • Esperanto:
  • French: ou
  • Galician: ou
  • Italian: o
  • Portuguese: ou
  • Romanian: au
  • Romansch: u
  • Spanish: o/u

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *aw-, from Proto-Indo-European *ew-, *ow- “to tie, to bind” > “to put on, to dress”. The original meaning was probably “to tie, to wrap (around the foot)”, whence “to put on (footwear)”. Cognates include Lithuanian aũti, Old Church Slavonic обути (obuti) (< *uti), Russian обуть (obút’), Belarusian абуць (abúc’), Ukrainian обути (obúty), Bulgarian обуя (obúja), Czech obouti, Polish obuć, Latin exuere (to take off) (< *ex-u-ere).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Verb[edit]

aut tr., 1st conj., pres. aunu, aun, aun / auju, auj, auj, past āvu

  1. put on footwear (shoes, boots, socks, etc.)
    zēns āva kājas — the boy put on footwear (lit. on his feet)
    aut kājas pastalās — to put on pastalas (simple footwear) (lit. to put one's feet into pastalas)
    aut kurpes kājas — to put on shoes (lit. to put shoes on one's feet)
  2. nosēdos uz akmens un gribēju aut kājas, bet kurpes bija ļoti sabristas — I sat down on a rock and wanted to put shoes on (lit. to put (my) feet (into shoes)), but the shoes were very wet
    Žanis āva kājās stulmeņu zābakus — Žanis put the long boots on (his) feet
  3. (figuratively, with kājas) to prepare for a journey (lit. to put on footwear)
    un tūliņ ķēniņš aun kājas savu sievu meklēt — and quickly the king puts on footwear to go looking for his wife

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Note that aut can take two complements, the footwear or the subject's feet. Either can be the direct object, in which case the other will be a locative complement (i.e., either "to put shoes on one's feet" or "to put one's feet into shoes").

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “aut” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) ault
  • (Sutsilvan) òlt
  • (Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) ot

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

aut m (feminine auta, masculine plural auts, feminine plural autas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) high

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English out.

Noun[edit]

aut m (Cyrillic spelling аут)

  1. (sports) area outside the playground borders