boot

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English[edit]

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Boots, noun - etymology 1, definition 1

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English boote, bote (shoe), from Old French bote (a high, thick shoe). Of obscure origin, but probably related to Old French bot (club-foot), Old French bot (fat, short, blunt), probably from Old Norse buttr (short, blunt), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz, *butaz (cut off, short, numb, blunt), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewt-, *bʰewd- (to strike, push, shock). Compare Norwegian butt (stump), Low German butt (blunt, plump), Old English bytt (small piece of land), Old English buttuc (end). More at buttock.

Noun[edit]

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boot (plural boots)

  1. A heavy shoe that covers part of the leg.
  2. A blow with the foot; a kick.
  3. (construction) A flexible cover of rubber or plastic, which may be preformed to a particular shape and used to protect a shaft, lever, switch, or opening from dust, dirt, moisture, etc.
  4. A torture device used on the feet or legs, such as a Spanish boot.
  5. (US) A parking enforcement device used to immobilize a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp.
  6. A rubber bladder on the leading edge of an aircraft’s wing, which is inflated periodically to remove ice buildup. A deicing boot.
  7. (obsolete) A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach.
  8. (archaic) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.
  9. (Australia, UK, New Zealand, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan or saloon car.
    • 1998, Ruth Rendell, A Sight For Sore Eyes, 2010, page 260,
      He heaved the bag and its contents over the lip of the boot and on to the flagstones. When it was out, no longer in that boot but on the ground, and the bag was still intact, he knew the worst was over.
    • 2003, Keith Bluemel, Original Ferrari V-12 1965-1973: The Restorer's Guide, unnumbered page,
      The body is constructed of welded steel panels, with the bonnet, doors and boot lid in aluminium on steel frames.
    • 2008, MB Chattelle, Richmond, London: The Peter Hacket Chronicles, page 104,
      Peers leant against the outside of the car a lit up her filter tip and watched as Bauer and Putin placed their compact suitcases in the boot of the BMW and slammed the boot lid down.
  10. (computing, informal) The act or process of removing somebody from a chat room.
  11. (UK, slang) unattractive person, ugly woman
  12. (firearms) A hard plastic case for a long firearm, typically moulded to the shape of the gun and intended for use in a vehicle.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. To kick.
    I booted the ball toward my teammate.
  2. To put boots on, especially for riding.
    • Ben Jonson
      Coated and booted for it.
  3. To apply corporal punishment (compare slippering).
  4. (informal) To forcibly eject.
    We need to boot those troublemakers as soon as possible
  5. (slang) To vomit.
    Sorry, I didn’t mean to boot all over your couch.
  6. (computing, informal) To disconnect forcibly; to eject from an online service, conversation, etc.
    • 2002, Dan Verton, The Hacker Diaries - Page 67
      As an IRC member with operator status, Swallow was able to manage who was allowed to remain in chat sessions and who got booted off the channel.
    • 2003, John C. Dvorak, Chris Pirillo, Online! - Page 173
      Even flagrant violators of the TOS are not booted.
    • 2002, Jobe Makar, Macromedia Flash Mx Game Design Demystified - Page 544
      In Electroserver, the kick command disconnects a user totally from the server and gives him a message about why he was booted.
Usage notes[edit]

The more common term for “to eject from a chatroom” etc. is kick.

Synonyms[edit]
  • (kick): hoof, kick
  • (disconnect from online conversation): kick
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English boote, bote, bot, from Old English bōt (help, relief, advantage, remedy; compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance), from Proto-Germanic *bōtō (atonement, improvement), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeHd-, *bʰoHd- (good). Akin to Old Norse bót (bettering, remedy) (Danish bod), Gothic 𐌱𐍉𐍄𐌰 (bōta), German Buße.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot (countable and uncountable, plural boots)

  1. (dated) remedy, amends
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Thou art boot for many a bruise / And healest many a wound.
    • Wordsworth
      next her Son, our soul's best boot
  2. (uncountable) profit, plunder
  3. (obsolete) That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged; compensation; recompense
    • Shakespeare
      I'll give you boot, I'll give you three for one.
  4. (obsolete) Profit; gain; advantage; use.
    • Shakespeare
      Then talk no more of flight, it is no boot.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. (transitive) to profit, avail, benefit
    • Hooker
      What booteth it to others that we wish them well, and do nothing for them?
    • Byron
      What subdued / To change like this a mind so far imbued / With scorn of man, it little boots to know.
    • Southey
      What boots to us your victories?
  2. To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition.
    • Shakespeare
      And I will boot thee with what gift beside / Thy modesty can beg.
Quotations[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening of bootstrap.

Noun[edit]

boot (plural boots)

  1. (computing) The act or process of bootstrapping; the starting or re-starting of a computing device.
    It took three boots, but I finally got the application installed.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. (computing) To bootstrap; to start a system, e.g. a computer, by invoking its boot process or bootstrap.
    When arriving at the office, first thing I do is booting my machine.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From bootleg (to make or sell illegally), by shortening

Noun[edit]

boot (plural boots)

  1. A bootleg recording.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch boot.

Noun[edit]

boot (plural bote)

  1. boat

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot m, f (plural boten, diminutive bootje n)

  1. boat

Synonyms[edit]

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