bot

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For Wiktionary's bots, see Wiktionary:Bots
See also: Bot, bót, bọt, bột, 'bot, and -bot

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly a modification of Scottish Gaelic boiteag (maggot).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot (plural bots)

  1. The larva of a bot fly, which infests the skin of various mammals, producing warbles, or the nasal passage of sheep, or the stomach of horses.
    • 1946, National Research Council of Canada, Canadian Journal of Research: Zoological Sciences, page 76,
      One deer, later found to be heavily parasitized by bots, suffered severe vomiting attacks during the early spring.
    • 1984, Adrian Forsyth, Kenneth Miyata, Tropical Nature, page 157,
      Jerry prepared a glass jar with sterilized sand to act as a nursery for his pulsating bot, but despite his tender ministrations the larva dried out and died before it could encase itself in a pupal sheath.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From bottom.

Verb[edit]

bot (third-person singular simple present bots, present participle botting, simple past and past participle botted)

  1. (UK, slang) To bugger
  2. (Australia, informal) To ask for and be given something with the direct intention of exploiting the thing’s usefulness, almost exclusively with cigarettes.
    Can I bot a smoke?
    Jonny always bots off me. I just wish he’d get his own pack.
Usage notes[edit]

Although there are some references that mention that somebody could actually be a "bot" if they practice the art of botting, this noun is not really commonly used.

Synonyms[edit]
  • (To ask for something): bum (UK)

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from robot.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot (plural bots)

  1. (science fiction, informal) A physical robot.
    • 1998, David G. Hartwell (editor), Year's best SF 3, page 130,
      I stared at the bot and recognized her for the first time.
      She was me.
    • 2007, Peter F. Hamilton, The Dreaming Void, unnumbered page,
      The bot juddered to a halt, as the whole lower segment of its power arm darkened.
    • 2005, Greg Bear, Quantico, page 71,
      As he guided the bot, Andrews reminisced about his younger days in Wyoming, when he had witnessed a mishandled load of wheat puff out a dusty fog.
  2. (computing) A piece of software designed to complete a minor but repetitive task automatically or on command, especially when operating with the appearance of a (human) user profile or account.
    • 2009, Ryan Farley, Xinyuan Wang, Roving Bugnet: Distributed Surveillance Threat and Mitigation, Dimitris Gritzalis, Javier López (editors), Emerging Challenges for Security, Privacy and Trust: 24th IFIP TC 11 International Information Security Conference, page 42,
      The goals of IRC bots vary widely, such as automatically kicking other users off or more nefarious things like spamming other IRC users. In this paper, a free standing IRC bot is presented that monitors an IRC channel for commands from a particular user and responds accordingly.
    • 2009, Richard K. Neumann, Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing: Structure, Strategy, and Style, page 91,
      He is particularly good at creating web robots, which are also called bots.
      A bot is software that searches for certain kinds of websites and then automatically does something — good or bad — on each site. Google uses bots to search and index websites.
    • 2010, Dusty Reagan, Twitter Application Development For Dummies, page 59,
      Twitter bots can leverage Twitter′s text message support to allow users to accomplish tasks from their cell phones. You could consider Twitter accounts that are simply an automated import of blog′s RSS feed a Twitter bot.
  3. (video games) A computer-controlled character in a multiplayer video game, such as a first-person shooter.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bot (third-person singular simple present bots, present participle botting, simple past and past participle botted)

  1. (video games) To use a bot, or automated program.
    Players caught botting will be banned from the server.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From botar.

Noun[edit]

bot m (plural bots)

  1. A jump, leap
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bot

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of botre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of botre

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bot (English boat).

Noun[edit]

bot m (plural bots)

  1. boat
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Late Latin buttis.

Noun[edit]

bot m (plural bots)

  1. wineskin
  2. bagpipes
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from a derivative of Latin battuō, or alternatively of Germanic origin. Compare Italian botta, French botte.

Noun[edit]

bot m

  1. blow, slap, smack, whack, knock, strike, thud

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adjective[edit]

bot (comparative botter, superlative botst)

  1. not sharp, blunt, dull
  2. impolite, badly behaving: curt, blunt, rude
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

bot n (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. bone
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

bot m (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. flounder (a type of fish)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot m (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. (Belgium) boot

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

bot

  1. First-person singular preterite of bieten
  2. Third-person singular preterite of bieten

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot (plural botok)

  1. stick

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bot

  1. rafsi of botpi.

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *buzdos (tail, penis), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *gwosdʰos (piece of wood)

Noun[edit]

bot m

  1. tail
  2. penis

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot

  1. fine

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bōtō (recompense). Cognate with Old Frisian bōte, Old Saxon bōta, Dutch boete, Old High German buoza (German Buße), Old Norse bōt (Swedish bot), Gothic 𐌱𐍉𐍄𐌰 (bōta).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bōt f (nominative plural bōte)

  1. help, assistance, rescue, remedy, cure, deliverance from evil
    Byþ hræd bót. — The cure will be quick.
  2. mending, repair, improvement
    ... and án swulung þǽre cirican to bóte — and an offering to the church for repairs
  3. compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance
    For bóte his synna — for a redressing of his sins
  4. improvement in (moral) condition, amendment
    Hé tó bóte gehwearf — he was converted

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Possibly from a Latin root *botum, perhaps from botulus or *botium. See also butuc.

Noun[edit]

bot n (plural boturi)

  1. (usually of animals) snout, mouth
  2. bump
  3. hump

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

bot c

  1. fine
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish bōt (improvement), from Old Norse ᛒᚢᛏ (in the Latin script bót) whence also Icelandic bót). Akin to English boot (remedy", "profit"). Masculine in Late Modern Swedish.

Noun[edit]

bot c

  1. cure; remedy
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

bot (plural bots)

  1. boat

Declension[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bot

  1. a type of impolite behaviour: curt, blunt, rude
  2. dull (as a knife)

Adverb[edit]

bot

  1. very, quite

Noun[edit]

bot m

  1. flounder (a type of fish)