vessel

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vaissel (compare modern French vaisseau), from Latin vāscellum, diminutive of vāsculum, diminutive of vās (vessel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vessel (plural vessels)

  1. (nautical) Any craft designed for transportation on water, such as a ship or boat.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      But my hope was, that if I stood along this coast till I came to that part where the English traded, I should find some of their vessels upon their usual design of trade, that would relieve and take us in.
    • 2012 March 1, William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter, “The British Longitude Act Reconsidered”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 87: 
      Conditions were horrendous aboard most British naval vessels at the time. Scurvy and other diseases ran rampant, killing more seamen each year than all other causes combined, including combat.
  2. A container of liquid, such as a glass, goblet, cup, bottle, bowl, or pitcher.
  3. A person as a container of qualities or feelings.
    • Bible, Acts ix. 15
      He is a chosen vessel unto me.
    • Milton
      [The serpent] fit vessel, fittest imp of fraud, in whom to enter.
    • Dolly Parton, The Seeker lyrics:
      I am a vessel that’s empty and useless / I am a bad seed that fell by the way.
  4. (biology) A tube or canal that carries fluid in an animal or plant.
    Blood or lymph vessels in humans, xylem or phloem vessels in plants.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vessel (third-person singular simple present vessels, present participle vesselling, simple past and past participle vesselled)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To put into a vessel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

References[edit]

  • “vessel” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.

Anagrams[edit]