lever

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English[edit]

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A lever
A lever diagram

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French leveor, leveur (a lifter, lever (also Old French and French levier)), from Latin levator (a lifter), from levare, past part. levatus (to raise); see levant. Compare alleviate, elevate, leaven.

Noun[edit]

lever (plural levers)

  1. (mechanics)   A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; — used for transmitting and modifying force and motion.
    1. Specifically, a bar of metal, wood or other rigid substance, used to exert a pressure, or sustain a weight, at one point of its length, by receiving a force or power at a second, and turning at a third on a fixed point called a fulcrum. It is usually named as the first of the six mechanical powers, and is of three kinds, according as either the fulcrum F, the weight W, or the power P, respectively, is situated between the other two, as in the figures.
  2. A small such piece to trigger or control a mechanical device (like a button).
  3. (mechanics)   A bar, as a capstan bar, applied to a rotatory piece to turn it.
    • 2012 March 1, Henry Petroski, “Opening Doors”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 112-3: 
      A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place.
  4. (mechanics)   An arm on a rock shaft, to give motion to the shaft or to obtain motion from it.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

lever (third-person singular simple present levers, present participle levering, simple past and past participle levered)

  1. (transitive) To move with a lever.
    With great effort and a big crowbar I managed to lever the beam off the floor.
  2. (figuratively, transitive) To use, operate like a lever.
  3. (chiefly UK, finance) To increase the share of debt in the capitalization of a business.
    • 1989 Jun 26, “Corporate America wants its privacy”, Minneapolis Star-Tribune:
      "The equity holders want you to 'lever up,' use as much debt as you can," said David Stanley, chairman of Kansas City-based Payless Cashways,
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English comparative of leve (dear) of Germanic origin (compare German lieb) or lief.

Adverb[edit]

lever (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Rather.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French lever.

Noun[edit]

lever (plural levers)

  1. (rare) A levee.
    • 1742, Miss Robinson, Mrs. Delany's Letters, II.191:
      We do not appear at Phœbus's Levér.
    • 2011, Tim Blanning, "The reinvention of the night", Times Literary Supplement, 21 Sep 2011:
      Louis XIV’s day began with a lever at 9 and ended (officially) at around midnight.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

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Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lifr, from Proto-Germanic *librō, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to smudge, stick), from Proto-Indo-European *ley- (to be slimy, be sticky, glide).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /levər/, [lewˀɐ]

Noun[edit]

lever c (singular definite leveren, plural indefinite levere)

  1. liver
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See leve (to live).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leːvər/, [ˈleːvɐ]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. present tense of leve

Etymology 3[edit]

See levere (to deliver).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lever/, [leˈveˀɐ]

Verb[edit]

lever or levér

  1. Imperative of levere.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch levere, from Old Dutch *livara, from Proto-Germanic *librō. Cognate with English liver, German Leber, Swedish lever.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: le‧ver

Noun[edit]

lever f (plural levers, diminutive levertje n)

  1. (anatomy) The organ liver
  2. An edible animal liver as a dish or culinary ingredient
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leveren
  2. imperative of leveren

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin levāre, present active infinitive of lēvō (to elevate), from levis (light, not heavy)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. (transitive) to raise, to lift
  2. (reflexive) to rise
  3. (reflexive) to get up (out of bed)
    Je me lève, je me lave.
    I get up, I wash.
  4. (reflexive, of fog, rain and etc) to clear, to lift

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

  • This verb is conjugated mostly like the regular -er verbs (parler and chanter and so on), but the -e- /ə/ of the second-to-last syllable becomes -è- /ɛ/ when the next vowel is a silent or schwa -e-. For example, in the third-person singular present indicative, we have il lève rather than *il leve. Other verbs conjugated this way include acheter and mener. Related but distinct conjugations include those of appeler and préférer.

Noun[edit]

lever m (plural levers)

  1. the act of getting up in the morning

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

le- + ver

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛvɛr/
  • Hyphenation: le‧ver

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. (transitive) To knock down

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

lēver

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of levo

Middle English[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lever

  1. Rather.
    For him was lever have at his bed's head
    Twenty bookes, clad in black or red,
    . . . Than robes rich, or fithel, or gay sawtrie.
    The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer
    But lever than this worldés good
    She would have wist how that it stood
    Tales of the Seven Deadly Sins, John Gower.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lifr, from Proto-Germanic *librō, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to smudge, stick), from Proto-Indo-European *ley- (to be slimy, be sticky, glide).

Noun[edit]

lever m, f (definite singular leveren or levra, indefinite plural levere or levre or levrer, definite plural leverne or levrene)

  1. (anatomy) a liver
  2. liver (eaten as food)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. present tense of leve

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lifr, from Proto-Germanic *librō, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to smudge, stick), from Proto-Indo-European *ley- (to be slimy, be sticky, glide).

Noun[edit]

lever f (definite singular levra, indefinite plural levrar or levrer, definite plural levrane or levrene)

  1. (anatomy) a liver
  2. liver (eaten as food)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. present tense of leva
  2. present tense of leve

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin lēvō

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. to lift (up)
  2. (reflexive, se level) to get up (get out of bed)

Conjugation[edit]

  • This verb conjugates like other verbs ending in -er. In addition, it has a stressed stem liev- distinct from the unstressed stem lev-. The forms that would normally end in *-v, *-vs, *-vt are modified to f, s, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lifr, from Proto-Germanic *librō, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to smudge, stick), from Proto-Indo-European *ley- (to be slimy, be sticky, glide).

Noun[edit]

lever c

  1. (anatomy) a liver
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lever

  1. present tense of leva.