lief

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lēof, from Proto-Germanic *leubaz. Cognate with Dutch lief, German lieb, Russian любо́вь (ljubóvʹ), Polish luby, Swedish and Norwegian Nynorsk ljuv, Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌿𐍆𐍃 (liufs).

Adverb: Compare German lieber, Dutch liever (preferably, rather)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lief (comparative liefer or liever, superlative liefest)

  1. (archaic) beloved, dear, agreeable
  2. (archaic) willing

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lief (comparative liefer or liever, superlative liefest)

  1. (archaic, except UK dialectal) Readily, willingly.
    • 1869, RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone, II:
      these great masters of the art, who would far liefer see us little ones practice it, than themselves engage [...].
    I'd as lief have one as t'other.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Quotations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *liof, from Proto-Germanic *leubaz, from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ-. Compare archaic English lief, German lieb.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lief (comparative liever, superlative liefst)

  1. nice, sweet
  2. beloved

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

lief n (plural lieven, diminutive liefje n)

  1. one's beloved in a romantic relationship, i.e. a boyfriend or girlfriend

Derived terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lief

  1. Past of laufen ‘to walk

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

lief m (plural liefs)

  1. roof

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (contracted) lee

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lēof, from Proto-Germanic *leubaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lief (comparative liefer, superlative liefest)

  1. dear, beloved