arm

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See also: Arm, Arms, ARM, Arm., and ärm

Contents

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together).

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. The portion of the upper human appendage, from the shoulder to the wrist and sometimes including the hand.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. He had him gripped firmly by the arm, since he felt it was not safe to let him loose, and he had no immediate idea what to do with him.
    She stood with her right arm extended and her palm forward to indicate “Stop!”
  2. (anatomy) The extended portion of the upper limb, from the shoulder to the elbow.
    The arm and forearm are parts of the upper limb in the human body.
  3. A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.
    the arms of an octopus
  4. A long, narrow, more or less rigid part of an object extending from the main part or centre of the object, such as the arm of an armchair, a crane, a pair of spectacles or a pair of compasses.
    The robot arm reached out and placed the part on the assembly line.
  5. A bay or inlet off a main body of water.
    Shelburne Bay is an arm of Lake Champlain.
  6. A branch of an organization.
    the cavalry arm of the military service
  7. (figuratively) Power; might; strength; support.
    the arm of the law
    the secular arm
    • Bible, Isa. lii. 1
      To whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?
  8. (baseball, slang) A pitcher
    • The team needs to sign another arm in the offseason.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed) (obsolete)

  1. To take by the arm; to take up in one's arms.
    • Shakespeare
      And make him with our pikes and partisans / A grave: come, arm him.
    • Two N. Kins
      Arm your prize; / I know you will not lose him.
  2. To supply with arms or limbs.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      His shoulders broad and strong, / Armed long and round.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English arm (poor, wretched), from Old English earm (poor, miserable, pitiful, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armer or more arm, superlative armest or most arm)

  1. (UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Poor; lacking in riches or wealth.
  2. (UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To be pitied; pitiful; wretched.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Middle English, from Old French arme, from Latin arma (weapons), from Proto-Indo-European *ar-mo-, a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to fit together), hence ultimately cognate with etymology 1.

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. (usually used in the plural) A weapon.
  2. (in the plural) heraldic bearings or insignia
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. To supply with armour or (later especially) weapons.
  2. To prepare a tool or a weapon for action; to activate.
    Remember to arm an alarm system.
  3. To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency.
    to arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling
  4. (figuratively) To furnish with means of defence; to prepare for resistance; to fortify, in a moral sense.
    • Bible, 1 Peter iv. 1
      Arm yourselves [] with the same mind.
  5. To fit (a magnet) with an armature.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch arm.

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm

Cimbrian[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm m (plural èrme)

  1. arm

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “arm” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ar-mo- (arm).

Noun[edit]

arm c (singular definite armen, plural indefinite arme)

  1. arm
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm, poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor).

Adjective[edit]

arm (neuter armt, definite and plural arme)

  1. poor
  2. unfortunate

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ar-mo-, a suffixed form of *ar- (to fit together). Cognate to Avestan [script needed] (arma) and Old Persian [script needed] (arma).

Noun[edit]

arm m (plural armen, diminutive armpje n)

  1. (anatomy) arm
    Iemand kneep in mijn arm. — Someone pinched my arm.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armer, superlative armst)

  1. poor (not rich)
    arme landen — poor nations
  2. poor (unfortunate)
    arme stakker… — poor soul…
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “Which word?”

From German.

Noun[edit]

arm (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. mercy
  2. scar

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse)

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative ärmer, superlative am ärmsten)

  1. poor (having little money)
  2. poor (to be pitied)

Antonyms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • arm in Duden online

Jersey Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to Dutch arm (poor). Compare German arm (poor).

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hai waz nît tevrêde täus en dârkîs tû râkni arm. []
      He was not content at home and therefore he became poor. []

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old French arme, from Latin arma (weapons).

Noun[edit]

arm m (genitive arm, plural armyn)

  1. arm, weapon, armament

Verb[edit]

arm (verbal noun armal, present participle garmal)

  1. to arm

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor, having few possessions
  2. unfortunate, pitiable
Descendants[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English earm (poor, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor
  2. miserable, wretched

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor

Noun[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armer, definite plural armene)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor

Noun[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armar, definite plural armane)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), whence also Old High German arm, Old Norse armr

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm

Old High German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor, miserable
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English arm, Old Norse armr.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. (anatomy) arm
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle High German: arm

References[edit]

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armoro, superlative armost)

  1. miserable, poor
Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • Low German: arm

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Low German: Arm

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin armus.

Noun[edit]

arm n (plural armuri)

  1. (regional, chiefly Oltenia) an animal's haunch, or a thigh on a person

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
  2. arm of the sea
  3. bar, beam

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English arm (poor), from Old English earm (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative mair arm, superlative maist arm)

  1. poor; wretched
  2. weak; thin; sickly

Verb[edit]

tae arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle armin, simple past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to crawl about miserably.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English armen (to arm), from Old French armer (to arm), from Latin armō (to arm). More at arm.

Verb[edit]

tae arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle armin, simple past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to arm, outfit with weapons or armour

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse armr (wing of a body).

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. the tail end of something, especially of fishing line

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm m (genitive and plural airm)

  1. army
  2. arm, weapon

Synonyms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]
  • Arm is usually used to refer to the entire fighting force of a nation etc, while armailt usually refers to the an "army" involved in a particular battle etc:
    Arm Bhreatainn anns a' Chogadh Mhòr - British Army in the First World War (the armed forces as a whole)
    armailt Bhreatannach ann an Afraga - British Army in Africa

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun[edit]

arm c

  1. (anatomy) arm; the body part
  2. arm; something extending from a body
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse armr (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. (dated) poor; to be pitied
  2. (dated) poor; with no possessions or money
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]