deed

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See also: dee'd and 'deed

English[edit]

A deed of displacement (4).

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dede, from Old English dēd, (West Saxon) dǣd (deed, act), from Proto-Germanic *dēdiz (deed), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰēti- (deed, action), *dʰéh₁tis. Cognate with West Frisian died, Dutch daad (deed, act), Low German Daat, German Tat (deed, action), Swedish and Danish dåd (act, action). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis, setting, arrangement). Related to do.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

deed (plural deeds)

  1. An action or act; something that is done.
    • Bible, Genesis xliv. 15
      And Joseph said to them, What deed is this which ye have done?
  2. A brave or noteworthy action; a feat or exploit.
    • Spenser
      knightly deeds
    • Dryden
      whose deeds some nobler poem shall adorn
  3. Action or fact, as opposed to rhetoric or deliberation.
    I have fulfilled my promise in word and in deed.
  4. (law) A legal contract showing bond.
    I inherited the deed to the house.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

deed (third-person singular simple present deeds, present participle deeding, simple past and past participle deeded)

  1. (informal) To transfer real property by deed.
    He deeded over the mineral rights to some fellas from Denver.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

deed

  1. singular past indicative of doen

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English dēad.

Adjective[edit]

deed

  1. dead (no longer alive)

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

deed

  1. past participle of dee
  2. (South Scots) past participle of dei