en

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Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

en

  1. English

Etymology 2[edit]

The name of the letter comes from Latin en. The typographic sense dates to 1793.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

en (plural ens)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N/n.
    The ems and ens at the beginnings and ends.
  2. (typography) A unit of measurement equal to half of an em (half of the height of the type in use).
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (imitating the French pronunciation) IPA(key): [ɑ̃], [õ]
  • (anglicised) IPA(key): /ɒn/, /ɑn/

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. Used in various phrases borrowed from French or formed as if borrowed from French (see "Derived terms" below).
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. and
    Ek sit en drink koeldrank — I sit and drink a cold drink.
  2. well
    En? — well?

Alemannic German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

en

  1. (indefinite) a, an

Declension[edit]

Declension of en
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative/accusative en e es -
dative emene enere emene -

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in.

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in

Usage notes[edit]

  • The preposition en contracts to n' before a word beginning with a vowel or h-: n'Asturies (in Asturias), n'honor (in honor)

Derived terms[edit]

English


Breton[edit]

Contraction[edit]

en

  1. e (preposition "in") + un (indefinite article "a(n)")
  2. e (preposition "in") + an (definite article "the")

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the final syllable of Latin domine (Mister).

Article[edit]

en m sg (elided n', feminine na)

  1. (Eastern Catalan) Personal article used before masculine given names instead of the definite article el.
Derived terms[edit]
  • can (contraction of ca and ne)
Usage notes[edit]
  • While this article (and its feminine counterpart na) is standard in Baleric Catalan, in other Eastern Catalan dialects its use is waning, and the elided of the definite article, l', is used before names beginning with vowels. There is no plural personal article, so the plural definite article els is used in all dialects.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin in (in, inside).

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin inde (thence).

Pronoun[edit]

en (proclitic, contracted n', enclitic ne, contracted enclitic 'n)

  1. represents an indeterminate number or quantity of a given noun
  2. represents a place (associated with the action described by the verb) that would be introduced by the preposition de
  3. replaces a phrase introduced by the preposition de
  4. replaces the object of a causative verb
Usage notes[edit]
  • En cannot be used more than once as the object of a given verb.
  • While en is usually used to replace phrases beginning with the prepostion de, adverbial phrases (e.g., de pressa) are replaced with hi.
  • En is sometimes used instead of ho to replace an adjective or indefinite noun as the predicate of a verb.
  • En is sometimes used popularly to add emphasis to a sentence: in this sense, it has no translation in English.
  • When en is used as a preposition to introduce the object of a verb, this object is replaced not by en but by hi:
    No crec en DéuNo hi crec.
Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

en

  1. width

Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in.

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Article[edit]

en (neuter et)

  1. a, an

Numeral[edit]

en (neuter et)

  1. (cardinal) one

Pronoun[edit]

en or én (neuter et or ét, definite ene)

  1. one

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch ende, from Middle Dutch ende, from Old Dutch enda, anda, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí. Compare Low German un, German und, West Frisian en, English and, Danish end.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. and
    De oude man en de zee.
    The Old Man and the Sea.
  2. well, so
    En, hoe gaat het ermee?
    Well, how're you doing?
    En?
    Well?
    En, wat zou dat?
    So what?
  3. (mathematics) plus, and
    Drie en vier is zeven.
    Three plus four is seven.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in, within, inside
    Ĝi estas en la domo.
    It is in (within, inside) the house.
  2. into (when followed by a noun or phrase in the accusative case)
    Li iras en la domon.
    He goes into the house.

Derived terms[edit]



Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese en, from Latin in (in), from Proto-Indo-European *én.

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 2: Númerus:
      Cumu to é custión de proporciós, sin que sirva de argumentu por nun fel falta, poemus vel que en a misma Europa hai Estaus Soberarius con menus territoriu que os tres lugaris nossus, cumu: []
      As everything is a matter of proportions, without its presence being an argument, we can see that even in Europe there are Sovereign States with less territory than our three places, such as: []

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [en]
  • Hyphenation: en

Verb[edit]

en

  1. The first-person singular form of the negation verb. The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).

Conjugation[edit]

  • The negative verb has no infinitive form. The negative verb is the same with indicative, conditional and potential mood and, with those moods, it is conjugated only in person. (For the negative verb in the imperative mood, see älä/älköön/älkäämme/älkää/älkööt — the first person singular, naturally, does not have an imperative form. An archaic optative mood has a second-person singular form, ällös.)
singular plural
first person en emme
second person et ette
third person ei eivät

Usage notes[edit]

  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending -ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of en:
  • Indicative:
  • Minä näen. (I see.) -> Minä en näe. (I do not see.)
  • Minä näin. (I saw.) -> Minä en nähnyt. (I did not see.)
  • Minä olen nähnyt. (I have seen.) -> Minä en ole nähnyt. (I have not seen.)
  • Minä olin nähnyt. (I had seen.) -> Minä en ollut nähnyt. (I had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Minä näkisin. (I would see.) -> Minä en näkisi. (I would not see.)
  • Minä olisin nähnyt. (I would have seen.) -> Minä en olisi nähnyt. (I would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Minä nähnen. (I probably see.) -> Minä en nähne. (I probably do not see.)
  • Minä lienen nähnyt. (I have probably seen.) -> Minä en liene nähnyt. (I have probably not seen.)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in, inde.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

en

  1. Used as the object of a verb to indicate an indefinite quantity; of it, of them. Replaces the partitive article (du, de la, etc.)
    Tu as combien de livres ? J'en ai trois. — How many books do you have? I have three (of them).
    Y a-t-il beaucoup de pièces ? Oui. Il y en a beaucoup. — Are there many rooms? Yes, there are many (of them).
    Martin a trois sandwichs, mais j'en ai seulement deux. - Martin has three sandwiches, but I have only two (of them).
    Il y en a combien ? - How many of them are there?
    Je bois de l'alcool parce que j'en ai besoin - I drink alcohol because I need (of) it.
  2. Adverbial preposition indicating movement away from a place already mentioned.
    Est-ce qu'elle vient de Barcelone ? Oui, elle en vient. — Does she come from Barcelona? Yes, she does.
Related terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in (used to indicate space)
    J'habite en Angleterre.
    I live in England.
  2. by (used to indicate means)
    aller en bus
    go by bus
    partir en voiture
    leave by car
  3. as
    Il me traite en ami.
    He treats me as a friend.
  4. at (used to describe an ability)
    fort en histoire
    good at history
  5. of, made of (used to describe composition)
    une chaise en hêtre
    a chair made of beech/a beech chair
    une fourchette en métal
    a fork made of metal/a metal fork
  6. in (during the following time (used for months and years))
    en 1993
    in 1993
    en janvier
    in January
    en septembre 2001
    in September 2001
  7. (as a gerund, followed by a present participle) while
    C'est en trichant qu'il est devenu champion.
    It was by cheating that he became champion.
  8. (as a gerund, followed by a present participle) by, in (describing a way of getting something)
  9. in (used to describe color)
    une photo en noir et blanc
    a photo in black and white
  10. in (used to describe feelings)
    en détresse
    in distress
    en bonne humeur
    in a good mood
  11. in (as part of something)
    en équipe
    on a team

Usage notes[edit]

  • En in the sense of while is often not translated into English.

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in.

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in

Usage notes[edit]

The preposition en contracts to n- before articles, before third-person tonic pronouns, and before the determiners algún and outro.

Derived terms[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon ēn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Compare Dutch een, German ein, West Frisian ien, English one.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (in some dialects) IPA(key): /ˈɛɪ̯n/

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (in other dialects, including Low Prussian) een
  • (in some dialects) ein

Article[edit]

en m (indefinite article)

  1. (in some dialects) a, an

Article[edit]

en n (indefinite article)

  1. (in some dialects) a, an

Numeral[edit]

en

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) one (1)

See also[edit]

  • Dutch Low Saxon: een
  • Plautdietsch een, (cardinal number) eent

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French un (one), from Latin ūnus (one).

Numeral[edit]

en

  1. one

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Adverb[edit]

en

  1. how
    Nei, Elín? En gaman að sjá þig!
    Elín? How good to see you!

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. but
    Bjóðum Önnu en ekki Björk.
    Let's invite Anna but not Björk.
    Ég ætla að brauð en ekki mjólk.
    I'll have bread but not milk.
  2. than (with an adjective in the comparative)
    Ég er betri en bróðir minn.
    I'm better than my brother.

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Sometimes Icelandic uses en where English would use and:
    Jón var sonur hans, en Ása dóttir
    John was his son, and Ása his daughter
    "Veðrið var ekki gott framan af: rigning á fjallinu, en þoka í byggð."
    Rannsókn embættis sérstaks saksóknara á meintum innherjasvikum Baldurs Guðlaugssonar stóð yfir í rúmlega ár, en FME kærði málið með bréfi til embættisins hinn 9. júlí á síðasta ári.[1]
  • In the sentence
    Hún er skemmtilegri en ég.
    She is more fun than I am.
the word en (than) may be omitted, and the subject (which is ég (I) in this example) may be used in the dative case.
Hún er skemmtilegri mér.
Now the sentence has the same meaning, only much more formal. In order to make the sentence more casual- one can reposition the subject (in the dative).
Hún er mér skemmtilegri.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.visir.is/baldur-akaerdur-fyrir-innherjasvik-og-brot-i-opinberu-starfi-/article/2010914009530&sp=1

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French en, Spanish en, from Latin in, inde from Proto-Indo-European *én (in).

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

en

  1. rōmaji reading of えん

Jersey Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch een, from Old Dutch ēn, ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Article[edit]

en

  1. the

Etymology 2[edit]

Cognate to Dutch en (and). Compare English and.

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. and
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hai waz nît tevrêde täus en []
      He was not content at home and []

Kott[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔäń (˜x-) ("wave").

Noun[edit]

en (plural ēnaŋ)

  1. wave

Noun[edit]

en

  1. plural form of ei

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ēn!

  1. lookǃ beholdǃ (presenting something in a lively or indignant manner)
  2. reallyǃ? (surprise or anger in questions)
  3. c'monǃ (exhortation to action in imperatives)

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

en (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter N.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Multiple Latin names for the letter N, n have been suggested. The most common is en or a syllabic n, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , ən, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιννε (inne).

Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63
  • en in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Latvian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

en m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter N/n.

See also[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

en m, n

  1. Indefinite article; a, an
    Ech droen en Hutt wann et reent.
    I wear a hat when it rains.
    Hues du e bloe Stëft?
    Do you have a blue pen?

Declension[edit]

Luxembourgish indefinite articles
masculine feminine neuter
nom./acc. en eng en
dative engem enger engem

Pronoun[edit]

en

  1. third-person masculine singular, accusative: him
    Hues du e gefrot?
    Have you asked him?
  2. unstressed form of hien
  3. unstressed form of hinnen

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Due to the Eifel Rule, the final -n is lost when the following word begins with a consonant other than <d>, <h>, <n>, <t> or <z>.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

en

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of én.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of ěn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of èn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. Alternative form of ende.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French < Latin in.

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. on; on to

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Article[edit]

en m (feminine ei, neuter et)

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Numeral[edit]

en m (feminine ei, neuter ett)

  1. one

Old French[edit]

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in; inside
  2. on; upon
    • 12th Century, Unknown, Raoul de Cambrai:
      qi en la crois fu mis
      [He] who was put on the cross

Descendants[edit]

  • French: en

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ainaz.

Numeral[edit]

ēn

  1. one

Descendants[edit]

  • West Frisian: ien

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in (in), from Proto-Indo-European *én (in).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, E codex, cantiga 294 (facsimile):
      Como hũa moller q̇ iogaua os dados en pulla lançou hũa pedra aa omagen de ſ[ant]a mari[a] por q̇ perdera ⁊ parou un angeo de pedra que y eſtava a mão ⁊ reçibiu o colpe.
      How a woman who was playing dice in Apulia threw a stone at the statue of Holy Mary because she had lost, and an angel of stone which was there reached out its hand and received the blow.

Descendants[edit]

  • Fala: en
  • Galician: en
  • Portuguese: em

Old Saxon[edit]

Old Saxon cardinal numbers
0 1 2
    Cardinal : ēn

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ainaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ēn

  1. one
    • thoh uui hēr te meti habdin garu im te geƀanne sō uui mahtin fargelden mēst tueho uuāri is noh than that iro ēnig thar ēnes gināmi
      Though we had food that we should buy to give him. The most doubt is still there that anyone once felt
      (Heliand, verse 2637)

Article[edit]

ēn

  1. a, an (rarely used)

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse einn.

Numeral[edit]

ēn m, f

  1. one

Slovene[edit]

Slovene numbers
< 0 2 >

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of earlier êden, from Proto-Slavic *(j)edinъ, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one, single).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

èn

  1. one

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

The form êden is used when the word does not modify a noun directly, but stands in predicate position. When counting or reciting numbers, the feminine form êna is normally used.


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

en

  1. in, at, on
    Estoy en casa - I am at home
    Estoy sentado en la computadora - I'm sitting at the computer
    en esta página - on this page
  2. in (a time)
    en la antigüedad - in antiquity
    en 1999 - in 1999
  3. in (a language)
    No conozco esta palabra en francés - I don't know this word in French
    en todos los idiomas - in all languages
  4. (used after some verbs and translated by various prepositions in English)
    Pienso en tí - I think of you.
  5. in (used in various expressions)
    en el sentido - in the sense.
    en nuestro afán - in our eagerness

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

en

  1. he
  2. him

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

en

  1. One (possessive: ens)
  2. Someone
Declension[edit]
Usage note[edit]

En has in recent years been used as a more gender-conscious alternative to the impersonal pronoun man. The development is in some ways parallel to the gender-neutral pronoun hen. Usage is common among certain speaker groups, but not universally acknowledged in the standard language.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

en (neuter ett)

  1. (cardinal) one
Related terms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

en c (neuter ett)

  1. the indefinite article: a, an.

Etymology 2[edit]

From earlier ene (sometimes also ener), from Old Norse einir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

en c

  1. juniper
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Turkic en, from Proto-Turkic *ēn (breadth, width).

Noun[edit]

en (definite accusative eni, plural enler)

  1. width
  2. a cachet on an animal or bonded goods
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Turkic , from Proto-Turkic.

Adverb[edit]

en

  1. An adverb which makes the adjective after it superlative. Examples: büyük: big; en büyük: the biggest

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian and, ende, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí. Compare North Frisian en, English and, Low German un, Dutch en, German und, West Frisian en, Danish end.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

en

  1. and