hi

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See also: HI, , and ні

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

American English (first recorded reference is to speech of a Kansas Indian), originally to attract attention, probably a variant of Middle English hy, hey (circa 1475) also an exclamation to call attention.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

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Wikipedia

hi

  1. A friendly, informal, casual greeting said when meeting someone.
    Hi, how are you?
    I just dropped by to say “hi”.
  2. An exclamation to call attention.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (friendly informal greeting): hello

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hi

  1. Informal spelling of high, often hyphenated.
    Get hi-quality videos here!
    Next, set the burner to hi.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hi (no attested plural)

  1. "Hi" or similar greeting.

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Tosk form of Gheg (pl. hin), from Proto-Albanian *skina, from *skines, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱenHis (compare Latin cinis ‘dust; cinder’, Ancient Greek κόνις (kónis) ‘ashes; dust’).

Noun[edit]

hi m (-ri)

  1. ashes

Basque[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. you (singular, familiar)

Breton[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. she

Catalan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hey (dialectal)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan y, i, hic, from Latin hīc (here) and ibī (there).

Pronoun[edit]

hi (enclitic and proclitic)

  1. represents a place associated with the action described by the verb, unless the place would be introduced by the preposition de
  2. there (in constructions such as "there is", "there are", etc.: see haver-hi)
  3. replaces an adverb (or adverbial phrase) describing the manner, instrument or association of an action
  4. replaces a phrase introduced by any preposition except de (most commonly a or en)
  5. replaces an indefinite noun or an adjective which is the predicate of a verb other than ésser, esdevenir, estar or semblar
  6. (Central Catalan) in combination with other object pronouns, the third-person singular indirect object pronoun ("to him", "to her", "to it")

Usage notes[edit]

  • When more than one object pronoun is associated with a given verb, hi is alway the last in the group.
  • Hi and ho cannot be used together with the same verb, nor can two his be used together.
  • It is sometimes stated that hi is never used to replace a compliment beginning with de. This is not completely accurate, as hi can replace adverbial phrases such as de pressa, de sobte, etc.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. she (third-person feminine singular personal pronoun).

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Norwegian hi, from Old Norse hið.

Noun[edit]

hi n (singular definite hiet, plural indefinite hier)

  1. hibernation
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeia for laughter or giggling.

Interjection[edit]

hi

  1. ha (representation of laughter)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hi

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Latin[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. nominative masculine plural of hic

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic هي (hiya)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. she

Inflection[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch hīe, from Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi m

  1. he

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. he

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse híð and híði.

Noun[edit]

hi n (definite singular hiet, indefinite plural hi, definite plural hia)

  1. lair (of an animal)
    Bjørnen har gått i hi for vinteren.
    The bears have entered their lairs for the winter.

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. feminine form of hin

Etymology 3[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hi

  1. hee; expression of snickering

References[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. he

Old Irish[edit]

Preposition[edit]

hi

  1. Alternative form of i.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Corrop inonn cretem bes hi far cridiu ⁊ a n-as·beraid hó bélib.
      So that the belief which is in your heart and what ye utter with your lips may be the same.

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *íh₂.

Pronoun[edit]

hi

  1. she, her