sal

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Sal, sál, şal, šal, šál, and sâl

Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry, obsolete) salt
Usage notes[edit]

Was used predominantly to form the names of various chemical compounds.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (plural sals)

  1. Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree.
    • 1989, Thomas Weber, Hugging the trees: the story of the Chipko movement (page 18)
      As the sals were cut in the lower foothill districts the loggers looked towards the mountains in their search for other hardwood timber.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zal.

Verb[edit]

sal (present sal, past sou)

  1. shall, will

Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ast

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal m (plural sales)

  1. salt

Esperanto[edit]

Abbreviation [please replace this header][edit]

sal

  1. (text messaging) Abbreviation of saluton (hello).

Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal f

  1. salt

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. salt

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. salt

Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal f

  1. year

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-. Cognates include Sanskrit सलिल (salila), Old Armenian աղ (), Ancient Greek ἅλς (háls), Tocharian A sāle, and Old English sealt (English salt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sāl m (genitive salis); third declension Can be masculine or neuter, but the plural is masculine (sales).

  1. salt
    cum grānō salis : with a grain of salt
  2. wit

Inflection[edit]

This table shows how sal is inflected when it is masculine. If neuter, the accusative is sāl.

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sāl salēs
genitive salis salum
dative salī salibus
accusative salem salēs
ablative sale salibus
vocative sāl salēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sal

  1. rafsi of sakli.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse salr.

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. A large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held.
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  • “sal” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sǫðull.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. saddle
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  • “sal” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sal (payment).

Noun[edit]

sal n (definite singular salet, indefinite plural sal, definite plural sala)

  1. sale

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal (past saled, active participle salent)

  1. (auxiliary) shall, will, goes in front of a verb in order to mark it as having the future tense

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sailą (rope). Cognate with Old Saxon sēl (Dutch zeel), Old High German seil (German Seil).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sāl m

  1. rope, cord, rein

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Saleiros com sal.

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese sal, from Latin salem (salt, wit), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l- (salt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal m (plural sais)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, a substance used as a condiment and preservative)
  2. (chemistry) salt (any compound formed from the reaction of an acid with a base)
  3. (usually in the plural) bath salt (any of several inorganic salts sometimes added to bath water)
  4. (figuratively) wit; the quality of being engaging

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Turkish sal, from Persian شال (šāl).

Noun[edit]

sal n (plural saluri)

  1. (rare) shawl, scarf
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of salut.

Interjection[edit]

sal!

  1. (informal) hey!
  2. (informal) bye!
Synonyms[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) salt

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sāl (compare Catalan sal, French sel, Italian sale, Portuguese sal, Romanian sare), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-, a root shared by English salt.

Noun[edit]

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt; table salt
  2. (chemistry) salt
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of salir.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal c

  1. a large room (for dining or meetings)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (definite accusative salı, plural sallar)

  1. raft

Verb[edit]

sal (third-person singular simple present salar)

  1. set free!

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

Venetian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia vec

sal m (plural sałi)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, non-chemical usage)

sal m (plural sali)

  1. (chemistry) salt

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (plural sals)

  1. salt

Declension[edit]