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Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of saber

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. second-person singular imperative of ser

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

(3d sing. masc. conjunctive)

  1. he; (referring to a masculine noun) it
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish, from Proto-Celtic, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs. Compare Scottish Gaelic sia, Manx shey.

Numeral[edit]

  1. six
Usage notes[edit]

Can be followed by either the singular or the plural form of the noun it modifies. Triggers lenition of a following singular noun. Prefixes h- to a following vowel-initial plural noun.

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
  • seisear (used to modify nouns referring to human beings)

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
shé
after "an", tsé
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin .

Pronoun[edit]

  1. oneself, himself, herself

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Becomes se when in combination with verbs or other pronouns.
  • Becomes si when part of a reflexive verb.

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seik-.

Adjective[edit]

m (feminine sècque, masculine plural sés, feminine plural sècques)

  1. dry

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French seir, soir, from Latin sērō (at a late hour, late), from sērus (late).

Noun[edit]

m (plural sés)

  1. evening

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin sāl.

Noun[edit]

m (plural sés)

  1. salt

Ladin[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. first-person singular present indicative of savei

Pronoun[edit]

  1. oneself, himself, herself

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese see, from Latin sēdēs (seat), from sedeō (I sit), from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 f (plural sés)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) see (the cathedral and region under the jurisdiction of a bishop)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See saber

Verb[edit]

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of saber.
    No . — “I do not know.”

Etymology 2[edit]

See ser

Verb[edit]

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of ser.

Etymology 3[edit]

See

Interjection[edit]

  1. (colloquial, Chile) yes

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zee.

Noun[edit]

  1. sea

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

 ?

  1. salt