one

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See also: -one

English[edit]

English cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : one
    Ordinal : first
    Adverbial : once
English Wikipedia article on one

Alternative forms[edit]

  • wone, o (both obsolete)
  • Arabic numeral: 1 (see for numerical forms in other scripts)
  • Roman numeral: I

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English one, oon, on, oan, an, from Old English ān ("one"; same word as an), from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (single, one). Cognate with Scots ae, ane, wan, yin (one); North Frisian ån (one); Saterland Frisian aan (one); West Frisian ien (one); Dutch een, één (one); German Low German een; German ein, eins (one); Swedish en (one); Icelandic einn (one); Latin unus (one) (Old Latin oinos); Russian один (odin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

one

  1. (cardinal) A numerical value equal to 1; the first number in the set of natural numbers (especially in number theory); the cardinality of the smallest nonempty set. Ordinal: first.
    There is only one Earth.
    In many cultures, a baby turns one year old a year after its birth.
    One person, one vote.
  2. The ordinality of an element which has no predecessor, usually called first or number one.

Synonyms[edit]

  • For symbolic forms of this entry, see 1.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

one (possessive one’s, plural ones)

  1. (impersonal pronoun)  One thing (among a group of others); one member of a group.
    The big one looks good.   I want the green one.   A good driver is one who drives carefully.
  2. (impersonal pronoun, sometimes with "the")  The first mentioned of two things or people, as opposed to the other.
    She offered him an apple and an orange; he took one and left the other.
  3. (indefinite personal pronoun)  Any person (applying to people in general).
    One shouldn’t be too quick to judge.   One’s guilt may trouble one, but it is best not to let oneself be troubled by things which cannot be changed.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, The Mirror and the Lamp[1]:
      She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace, [] ; and the way she laughed, cackling like a hen, the way she talked to the waiters and the maid,  [] — all these unexpected phenomena impelled one to hysterical mirth, and made one class her with such immortally ludicrous types as Ally Sloper, the Widow Twankey, or Miss Moucher.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, The China Governess[2]:
      ‘It's rather like a beautiful Inverness cloak one has inherited. Much too good to hide away, so one wears it instead of an overcoat and pretends it's an amusing new fashion.’
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page vii
      With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get []
    • 2013 September 6, Philip Hoare, “If we're all Martians, who are the aliens?”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 13, page 48: 
      One has to admire the sheer optimism of modern science: I love the fact that there is such a discipline as astrobiology, whose practitioners' task is to imagine what life might be like on other planets. Yet here on the home planet we have profoundly strange aliens of our own.
  4. (pronoun)  Any person, entity or thing.
    driver, noun: one who drives.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (unidentified person): you, they in nominative personal case.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

one (plural ones)

  1. (mathematics) The neutral element with respect to multiplication in a ring.
  2. The digit or figure 1.
  3. (US) A one-dollar bill.
  4. (cricket) One run scored by hitting the ball and running between the wickets; a single.
  5. A joke or amusing anecdote.
  6. (Internet slang, leetspeak, sarcastic) Used instead of ! to amplify an exclamation, imitating unskilled users who forget to press the shift key while typing exclamation points.
    A: SUM1 Hl3p ME im alwyz L0ziN!!?!
    B: y d0nt u just g0 away l0zer!!1!!one!!one!!eleven!!1!
    • 2003 September 26, "DEAL WITH IT!!!!11one!!", in alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube, Usenet
    • 2004 November 9, "AWK sound recorder!!!11!!11one", in comp.lang.awk, Usenet
    • 2007 December 1, "STANFORD!!1!!1!one!11!!1oneone!1!1!", in rec.sport.football.college, Usenet
  7. (colloquial) A particularly special or compatible person or thing.
    • I knew as soon I met him that John was the one for me and we were married within a month.
    • That car's the one — I'll buy it.
    • 1995, Bryan Adams, Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?
      When you love a woman then tell her
      that she's really wanted
      When you love a woman then tell her that she's the one
      'cause she needs somebody to tell her
      that it's gonna last forever

Synonyms[edit]

  • (mathematics: multiplicative identity):: unity
  • (US: one-dollar bill):: single
  • (sarcastic substitution for !): 1, eleven

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

one (not comparable)

  1. Of a period of time, being particular; as, one morning, one year.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      One morning I had been driven to the precarious refuge afforded by the steps of the inn, after rejecting offers from the Celebrity to join him in a variety of amusements. But even here I was not free from interruption, for he was seated on a horse-block below me, playing with a fox terrier.
    One day the prince set forth to kill the dragon that had brought terror to his father’s kingdom for centuries.
  2. Being a single, unspecified thing; a; any.
    My aunt used to say, "One day is just like the other."
  3. Sole, only.
    He is the one man who can help you.
  4. Whole, entire.
    Body and soul are not separate; they are one.
  5. In agreement.
    We are one on the importance of learning.
  6. The same.
    The two types look very different, but are one species.
  7. Being a preeminent example.
    He is one hell of a guy.
  8. Being an unknown person with the specified name.
    The town records from 1843 showed the overnight incarceration of one “A. Lincoln”.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

one (third-person singular simple present ones, present participle oning, simple past and past participle oned)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to become one; to gather into a single whole; to unite.
    • Chaucer
      The rich folk that embraced and oned all their heart to treasure of the world.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

one

  1. rōmaji reading of おね

Mangarevan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. beach, sand, soil

Synonyms[edit]


Niuean[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand
  2. gunpowder

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ony, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eno-

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

one (personal pronoun)

  1. they (third-person plural feminine/neuter/non-personal masculine nominative pronoun)

Declension[edit]

1 used only with prepositions

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Rarotongan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Samoan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ǒne/
  • Hyphenation: o‧ne
EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronoun[edit]

òne (Cyrillic spelling о̀не)

  1. they (nominative plural of òna (she))

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ône

  1. they (feminine plural, more than two)

Declension[edit]

Forms between parentheses indicate clitic forms; the main forms are used for emphasis.

See also[edit]


Tahitian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand
  2. dust

References[edit]


Tikopia[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Tokelauan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Tuamotuan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qone, from Proto-Austronesian *qənay.

Noun[edit]

one

  1. sand

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

one

  1. (dative singular of on) to it