none

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See also: None

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • non [11th-17th c.]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English none, noon, non (not one), from Old English nān (not one, not any, none), from ne (not) + ān (one). Cognate with Scots nane (none), West Frisian neen & gjin (no, none), Dutch neen & geen (no, none), Low German nēn, neen (none, no one), German nein & kein (no, none), Latin nōn (not).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

none

In this picture, none of the blue shapes are inside the yellow boundary.
  1. Not any (one) of a given number or group of things. With singular or plural concord.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned. But he had then none of the oddities and mannerisms which I hold to be inseparable from genius, and which struck my attention in after days when I came in contact with the Celebrity.
    • 2006, Clive James, North Face of Soho, Picador 2007, page 253:
      Alas, none of these people were writing the reviews.
  2. Not any person: no one, nobody (with singular concord); no people (with plural concord).

Usage notes[edit]

Although uncountable nouns require none to be conjugated with a singular verb, e.g., None of this meat tastes right, the pronoun can be either singular or plural in most other cases, e.g., Fifty people applied for the position, but none were accepted., and None was qualified.

However, where the given or implied context is clearly singular or plural, then a matching verb makes better sense:

None of these men is my father.
None of those options is the best one.
None of these people are my parents.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Determiner[edit]

none

  1. (archaic outside Scotland) Not any; no.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XXV:
      the foles toke their lampes, but toke none oyle with them.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 138:
      None lasses were in the dunces' row. If one had been there people would have looked at her and felt sorry but not boys.

External links[edit]

Adverb[edit]

none (not comparable)

  1. ​ To no extent, in no way. [from 11th c.]
    I felt none the worse for my recent illness.
    He was none too pleased with the delays in the program that was supposed to be his legacy.
  2. Not at all. [from 13th c.]
    Now don't you worry none.
  3. (obsolete) No, not. [14th-16th c.]
    • c. 1390, Geoffrey Chaucer, "The Shipman's Tale", Canterbury Tales:
      And up into his contour-hous gooth he / To rekene with hymself, wel may be, / Of thilke yeer how that it with hym stood, / And how that he despended hadde his good, / And if that he encresses were or noon.

Noun[edit]

none (plural nones)

  1. A person without religious affiliation.
    • 2003, Jacob A. Belzen, Antoon Geels, Mysticism: A Variety of Psychological Perspectives, page 50:
      Both the religiously dis-identified ("nones") and the religiously committed report mystical experiences.
    • 2010, Robert D. Putnam, David E Campbell, American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, page 591:
      Stable nones, that is, people who report in both years that they have no religious affiliation, are, in fact, much less religious
    • 2013, Michael Corbett, Politics and Religion in the United States:
      we have grouped people into nones (no religion), Jews, Catholics, mainline Protestants, and evangelical protestants.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

none m (plural nonen, diminutive noontje n)

  1. (music) An interval of 13 (kleine none) of 14 (grote none) halftones.

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Feminine of nono. Compare Italian nonna, Venetian nona.

Noun[edit]

none f (plural nonis)

  1. grandmother

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none

  1. ninth

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none

  1. feminine plural of nono

Noun[edit]

none

  1. feminine plural of nono

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Numeral[edit]

none

  1. vocative masculine singular of nonus

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

none (plural nones)

  1. Alternative form of nonne

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nonus.

Noun[edit]

none m

  1. (music) An interval of 13 (liten none) or 14 (stor none) halftones.

Inflection[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

none f

  1. nominative singular of nonain

Tarantino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none

  1. ninth

Adverb[edit]

none

  1. no

See also[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

none f

  1. plural form of nona