once

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See also: önce

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ones (genitive of on (one) used adverbally), from Old English ānes (of one), genitive of ān (one). Compare Old Saxon ēnes (Dutch eens, once), Old High German einēst (once) (German einst). More at one, -s.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: wŭn(t)s, IPA(key): /wʌn(t)s/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌns
  • one and once are pronounced differently from the related words alone, only and atone. Stressed vowels often become diphthongs over time (Latin bona → Italian buona and Spanish buena), and this happened in the late Middle Ages to the words one and once, first recorded ca 1400: the vowel underwent some changes, from ōn → ōōōn → wōn → wōōn → wŏŏn → wŭn.

Adverb[edit]

once (not comparable)

  1. (frequency) One and only one time.
    I have only once eaten pizza.
  2. (temporal location) Formerly; during some period in the past.
    He was once the most handsome man around.
    I once had a bicycle just like that one.
    • 1944, Miles Burton, chapter 5, The Three Corpse Trick:
      The hovel stood in the centre of what had once been a vegetable garden, but was now a patch of rank weeds. Surrounding this, almost like a zareba, was an irregular ring of gorse and brambles, an unclaimed vestige of the original common.
    • 2013 June 14, Jonathan Freedland, “Obama's once hip brand is now tainted”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 18: 
      Now we are liberal with our innermost secrets, spraying them into the public ether with a generosity our forebears could not have imagined. Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet.
  3. (mathematics) Multiplied by one: indicating that a number is multiplied by one.
    Once three is three.
  4. As soon as.
    • 2013 June 7, Ed Pilkington, “‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 6: 
      In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.

Coordinate terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Conjunction[edit]

once

  1. As soon as; when; after.
    We'll get a move on once we find the damn car keys!
    Once you have obtained the elven bow, return to the troll bridge and trade it for the sleeping potion.
    Once he is married, he will be able to claim the inheritance.
    • 2011 September 27, Alistair Magowan, “Bayern Munich 2 - 0 Man City”, BBC Sport:
      Not only were Jupp Heynckes' team pacey in attack but they were relentless in their pursuit of the ball once they had lost it, and as the game wore on they merely increased their dominance as City wilted in the Allianz Arena.

Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Numeral[edit]

once

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Asturian[edit]

Asturian cardinal numbers
10 11 12
    Cardinal : once
    Ordinal : decimoprimeru

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūndecim.

Numeral[edit]

once (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin uncia

Noun[edit]

once f (plural onces)

  1. ounce (avoirdupois ounce)
  2. (figuratively, by extension) a little bit

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French lonce which became l'once (la + once), itself from Vulgar Latin *luncea < Latin lynx, ultimately from Ancient Greek λύγξ (lúnks), or possibly borrowed from Italian lonza.

Noun[edit]

once f (plural onces)

  1. snow leopard

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician cardinal numbers
10 11 12
    Cardinal : once
    Ordinal : undécimo

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūndecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

once (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

once

  1. plural form of oncia

Anagrams[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish cardinal numbers
10 11 12
    Cardinal : once
    Ordinal : undécimo

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin ūndecim, from unus (one) + decem (ten).

Cardinal number[edit]

once

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Etymology 2[edit]

Snacks were typically taken at 11 am.

Noun[edit]

once f (plural onces)

  1. (Latin America) snack (bread with tea or coffee).

Related terms[edit]