doze

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *dosen, from Old Norse dúsa (to doze, rest, remain quiet), from Proto-Germanic *dusēną (to be dizzy), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewes-, *dʰews- (to fly, whirl), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- (to fly, shake, reek, steam, smolder). Cognate with Icelandic dúsa (to doze), Swedish dialectal dusa (to doze, slumber), Danish døse (to doze), Old English dysiġ (foolish, stupid), Scots dosnit (stunned, stupefied), Icelandic dúra (to nap, slumber). More at dizzy.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

doze (third-person singular simple present dozes, present participle dozing, simple past and past participle dozed)

  1. (intransitive) To sleep lightly or briefly; to nap.
    I didn’t sleep very well, but I think I may have dozed a bit.
    • L'Estrange
      If he happened to doze a little, the jolly cobbler waked him.
  2. (transitive) To make dull; to stupefy.
    • Samuel Pepys
      I was an hour [] in casting up about twenty sums, being dozed with much work.
    • South
      They left for a long time dozed and benumbed.
  3. (intransitive, slang) To bulldoze.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

doze (plural dozes)

  1. (countable) a light, short sleep or nap
    I felt much better after a short doze.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duodecim.

Numeral[edit]

doze

  1. twelve

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese cardinal numbers
11 12 13
    Cardinal : doze
    Ordinal : décimo segundo
Portuguese Wikipedia article on doze

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese doze, from Vulgar Latin *dōdeci, from Latin duodecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

doze m, f

  1. twelve.

Noun[edit]

doze m (plural dozes)

  1. twelve.

Walloon[edit]

Numeral[edit]

doze

  1. twelve