bir

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See also: Bir and bír

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *bira, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérus (compare Old English byre, Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐍂 (baur, son))[1].

Noun[edit]

bir m (indefinite plural bij, definite singular biri, definite plural bijtë)

  1. son

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill , Leiden 2000, p. 26

Azeri[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic
Roman bir
Perso-Arabic بیر

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Azeri cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Numeral[edit]

Crimean Tatar cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

References[edit]


Gagauz[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Gagauz cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bier.

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

See also[edit]


Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bir

  1. rafsi of birka.

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English beer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

Synonyms[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بئر (biʾr).

Noun[edit]

bir m (plural bjar)

  1. well

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English byre (strong wind, storm).

Noun[edit]

bir (plural birs)

  1. A strong or favorable wind.
    • c. 1540, Destruction of Troy:
      Were blouen to þe brode se in a bir swithe.
  2. An armed assault or sally; a clash or encounter; a blow or stroke; an attack or affliction.
    • c. 1540, Destruction of Troy:
      A ᵹonge knight..suet to þe Duke With a bir on þe brest, þat backeward he ᵹode.
  3. Violence; strength; fury.
    • c. 1400, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight:
      With alle þe bur in his body he ber hit on lofte.
  4. An onrush, swiftness.
    • 1425, Wycliffe Bible, Judges 5:22:
      Enemyes fledden with bire.
  5. A charge on an account.
    • 1415, Account Rolls of the Abbey of Durham:
      Item in l bir de debito versus Rad'm Forster, 13 d.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary

Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German bira

Noun[edit]

bir ? (plural birn)

  1. The pear

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

·bir

  1. second-person singular present indicative conjunct of beirid

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir n (u-stem, plural beura)

  1. stake, spit, point; spear, spike
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 67b11
      beura glosses sudes (stake)
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir (plural beru)

  1. water, spring, well
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 158
      bir .i. uisce ... biror ⁊ inbir ⁊ tobur

References[edit]

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic bir, from Proto-Turkic *bir (one), *bīr (one).

Article[edit]

bir

  1. a, an

Noun[edit]

bir (definite accusative biri, plural birler)

  1. mono
  2. single

Declension[edit]

Numeral[edit]

Turkish cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Turkmen cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinji

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Uzbek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Uzbek cardinal numbers
  1 2
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinchi

bir

  1. (cardinal) one



Volapük[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Reformed in the 1920s from bil, to make it more like its etymons.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir (plural birs)

  1. beer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]