bir

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See also: Bir and bír

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *bira, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérus (compare Old English byre, Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐍂 (baur, son))[1].

Noun[edit]

bir m (indefinite plural bij, definite singular biri, definite plural bijtë)

  1. son

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill , Leiden 2000, p. 26

Azeri[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic
Roman bir
Perso-Arabic بير

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Azeri cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Numeral[edit]

Crimean Tatar cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

References[edit]


Gagauz[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Gagauz cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bier.

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

See also[edit]


Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bir

  1. rafsi of birka.

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English beer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir

  1. beer

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بئر (biʾr).

Noun[edit]

bir m (plural bjar)

  1. well

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English byre (strong wind, storm)

Noun[edit]

bir (plural birs)

  1. A strong or favorable wind.
    • circa 1540, Destruction of Troy:
      Were blouen to þe brode se in a bir swithe.
  2. An armed assault or sally; a clash or encounter; a blow or stroke; an attack or affliction.
    • circa 1540, Destruction of Troy:
      A ᵹonge knight..suet to þe Duke With a bir on þe brest, þat backeward he ᵹode.
  3. Violence; strength; fury.
    • circa 1400, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight:
      With alle þe bur in his body he ber hit on lofte.
  4. An onrush, swiftness.
    • 1425, Wycliffe Bible, Judges 5:22:
      Enemyes fledden with bire.
  5. A charge on an account.
    • 1415, Account Rolls of the Abbey of Durham:
      Item in l bir de debito versus Rad'm Forster, 13 d.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary

Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German bira

Noun[edit]

bir ? (plural birn)

  1. The pear

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

·bir

  1. second-person singular present indicative conjunct of beirid

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic bir, from Proto-Turkic *bir (one), *bīr (one).

Article[edit]

bir

  1. a, an

Noun[edit]

bir (definite accusative biri, plural birler)

  1. mono
  2. single

Declension[edit]

Numeral[edit]

Turkish cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinci

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Turkmen cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinji

bir

  1. (cardinal) one

Uzbek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bīr (one)

Cardinal number[edit]

Uzbek cardinal numbers
  1 2  > 
    Cardinal : bir
    Ordinal : birinchi

bir

  1. (cardinal) one



Volapük[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Reformed in the 1920s from bil, to make it more like its etymons.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bir (plural birs)

  1. beer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]