-t

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English -te, -t, from Old English -de, -d, from Proto-Germanic *-id- (preterite stem ending of class 1 weak verbs) and Proto-Germanic *-idaz (past participle ending of class 1 weak verbs).

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. Forms the past tense and/or past participle of some verbs (leapt, kept, dreamt, etc)
Usage notes[edit]

Some verbs have both an -ed and a -t form. The -t form has become obsolete for many verbs, e.g. toucht.

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably resulting from -s + the, or various other words beginning with th-, t-.

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. An excrescent ending appended to words suffixed with -s.
    against, amidst, amongst, betwixt, whilst
Usage notes[edit]

As with -st, when there is a shorter synonymous word (as in between/betwixt), the form with -t is generally considered more formal, old-fashioned, affected, and British.

Derived terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. forms the second and third person singular of the present tense
    redden - jij redt, hij redt
  2. forms the gij - form in both present and past tense
    breken - gij breekt - gij braakt
  3. (archaic) forms the plural form of the imperative
    staken - staakt!
  4. forms the past participle of weak verbs the root of which ends in a voiceless consonant
    bedanken - bedankt
  5. forms certain verbal nouns, mostly of strong verbs
    geven - gift

Egyptian[edit]

Suffix[edit]

t
  1. Used to form feminine singular forms of nouns and adjectives

Finnish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. (case suffix) Forms the nominative plural.
    • kissa -> kissat "cats"
  2. (case suffix) Forms the accusative forms of the personal pronouns and the interrogative pronoun ken.
    • minut = me
    • kenet? = who(m)?

Usage notes[edit]

  • Suffixed to the genitive singular stem. The accusative plural is identical with the nominative plural and is used for certain direct objects.
  • The personal pronouns and ken have this ending in the accusative; they are the only words that have different genitive and accusative singular forms.
nominative accusative
minä minut
sinä sinut
hän hänet
me meidät
te teidät
he heidät
kuka kenet

See also[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. (personal) Forms the second person singular of verbs.

Usage notes[edit]

Suffixed to the same stem as the first person singular suffix both in the present and the past tense.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. The accusative case ending.
    külföldi (foreigner) → Sok külföldit láttam a városban. - I saw many foreigners in the city.
    óra (clock, watch, hour) → Vettem egy órát. - I bought a watch.
    ember (human) → Sok embert láttunk. - We saw many people.
    kettő (two) → Hány könyvet vettél? - Kettőt. - How many books did you buy? - Two.
  2. (archaic) Added to a noun or an adjective to form the locative case.
    Kaposvár (Kaposvár, Hungarian town) → Kaposvárt (in Kaposvár)
    köz (gap) → közt (between, among)
  3. -ed, -t. Added to a verb to form the past tense.
    él (to live) → élt (lived)
    Kínában élt 10 évig - He lived in China for 10 years.
  4. -ed, -t. Added to a verb to form the past participle.
    zár (to close) → zárt (closed)
    Zárt ajtók mögött tanácskoztak. - They discussed behind closed doors.
  5. The causative suffix for verbs.
    terem (to come into existence) → teremt (to create)
  6. Added to a verb to form a noun.
    lesz (to become something) → t (existence, life)
    tesz (to make, do, place) → t (bet)

Usage notes[edit]

  • (accusative suffix): Can be added to nouns, adjectives and numerals. Whether a linking vowel will be used is hard to predict and thus needs to be learned with each word. A rule of thumb, however, is that older and shorter words tend to incorporate a vowel, rather than simply use -t.
    -t is added to words ending in a vowel. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-. Final -o in foreign words changes to -ó-.
    -ot is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -at is added to some back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -et is added to unrounded front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -öt is added to rounded front vowel words ending in a consonant
  • (locative suffix): Locative is used today only with some place names as an alternative to the inessive and superessive cases. The locative case is also to be found in short basic words like közt (between, among), from köz (gap).

See also[edit]


Manx[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. Alternative form of -it.

Pipil[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. Nominal absolutive suffix.
    *siwa-siwat
    *tutu-tutut
  2. Plural verb suffix.
    Titakwikat
    We sing

Usage notes[edit]

  • The nominal absolutive suffix -t is used vowel-ending stems. For consonant-ending stems, the suffix -ti is used.
  • Opposed to absolutive suffixes, construct suffixes used are -w (for vowel-ending stems), -(zero) (for consonant-ending stems) and -yu ("inalienable possession" marker)

Swedish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-t

  1. Suffix to create the definite singular form of neuter nouns ending in an unstressed vowel: hjärta (heart) → hjärtat (the heart)
  2. Suffix for creating adverbs out of adjectives: långsam (slow) → långsamt (slowly)
  3. Suffix used on the positive form of adjectives to denote that the corresponding noun is of neuter gender, indefinite form: en gul bil (a yellow car) → ett gult hus (a yellow house), the latter being neuter. However, the -a suffix is used for definite form independent of gender: den gula bilen (the yellow car) → det gula huset (the yellow house).
  4. Suffix to form the past participle of weakly inflected verbs, to be used when the corresponding participle belongs with a neuter noun in indefinite singular form.
  5. Suffix for forming supine of verbs of the first (ar-verbs) and second (weak er-verbs) conjugations; see also -it and -tt