-st

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. (archaic) Verb suffix for the second-person singular
    • Macbeth
      Thou com'st to use thy tongue.

Etymology 2[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. Marks ordinals written in digits when the final term of the spelled number is "first"
    the 21st century
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

-s +‎ -t of excrescent suffixes, with -s sometimes genitive.

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. Excrescent suffix (adding sound but largely not changing the meaning).
Usage notes[edit]

When there is a shorter synonymous word (as in amongst/among), the form with -st is generally considered more formal, old-fashioned, affected, or British. However, against is distinct from again, and midst is used in some context distinctly from mid.

Derived terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The suffix -st consists of two parts: a suffix -t (Proto-Indo-European *-ti) and an inserted -s-. The -s- is the result of a wrong segmentation of stem and suffix of a noun in cases where the stem of the noun ended with -s-. For example: a word like Dutch vorst (frost) could be interpreted as vors+t or as vor+st. This suffix existed already in Gothic (𐌰𐌽𐍃𐍄𐍃 (ansts), from 𐌿𐌽𐌽𐌰𐌽 (unnan)).[1]

Suffix[edit]

-st f (plural -sten)

  1. appended to the stem of a verb, this suffix yields a verbal noun; it is similar in function to the Dutch suffix -ing
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. appended to an adjective this suffix forms the superlative
    vreemd (strange) → vreemdst (strangest)

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. van Loey, "Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands", Zutphen, 8. druk, 1970, ISBN 90-03-21170-1; § 167

German[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. Verb suffix for the second-person singular
    Du hast eine Katze.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Icelandic[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. turns verbs into middle voice verbs

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch -ist, -ost, from Proto-Germanic *-istaz, *-ōstaz.

Suffix[edit]

-st

  1. -est. Forms the superlative of adjectives.

Derived terms[edit]

See Category:Middle Dutch adjective superlative forms.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]