sig

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A shortened form of signature.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sig (plural sigs)

  1. (informal) A signature, usually when used as a digital signature on emails.
    • 1995, Vince Emery, How to grow your business on the Internet
      Your sig should ideally be four or five lines long, six or seven at the maximum. Since it will be repeated on hundreds of messages, a long signature wastes bandwidth and is therefore rude.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sige (victory, success, triumph), from Old English sige (victory, success, triumph; sinking, setting (of the sun)), from Proto-Germanic *segaz, from Proto-Indo-European *segʰ- (to hold), *seghe-. Compare West Frisian sege, Dutch zege, German Sieg, Danish sejr, Swedish seger.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sig (plural sigs)

  1. A victory, triumph
    • 1993 July 25, Swain Wodening, “Sig Wife”, Odin's Gift, Norse Mythology & Asatru, Poetry & Music:
      Giver of sig (victory); Saver of life / With your sword sparing my loss of life / Saving my maegen; Saving my might / No sig wife waxed ever half so bright.
    • 2005, Diana L. Paxson, “XVIIII”, in Taking Up The Runes[1], ISBN 9781578633258, page 172:
      The Anglo-Saxon journey charm adapted for the ritual invokes "sig" power for every aspect of existence. / It is unfortunate that all the words surviving in English that could be used to translate sig have Latin roots, for it would seem that in the original languages, sig may have had connotations that are not present in words like "triumph" and "victory."
    • 2011, S.Watts Taylor, Tarnish[2], Fiction / Mystery, iUniverse, ISBN 9781462002023, page 54:
      "What is a Sig rune?" I asked, but I got no response from Brown

Etymology 3[edit]

Related to sink (to fall).

Noun[edit]

sig (uncountable)

  1. (UK, dialectal) Urine.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sik.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sig

  1. (reflexive) third-person pronoun
Usage notes[edit]

For all other persons (both singular and plural) the personal accusative pronoun is used.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See sige.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sig

  1. Imperative of sige.

Faroese[edit]

Verb[edit]

sig

  1. imperative singular form of siga

Conjugation[edit]


Greenlandic[edit]

Affix[edit]

sig

  1. used to express something which is far in a certain direction
    satsippoq
    He is far out towards the west.

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

sig n (genitive singular sigs, no plural)

  1. subsidence, (a sinking of something to a lower level)
  2. prolapse, a moving out of place, especially a protrusion of an internal organ syn.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sik (obsolete)

Pronoun[edit]

sig

  1. (reflexive) accusative third person reflexive pronoun meaning oneself (and also depending on context himself, herself, itself and themselves)
    Hann drap sig.
    He killed himself.
    Hún drap sig.
    She killed herself.
Declension[edit]
Declension of the word sig
singular plural
indef def indef def
nominative - - - -
accusative sig, sik sig, sik sig, sik sig, sik
dative sér sér sér sér
genitive sín sín sín sín
Derived terms[edit]

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sig

  1. rafsi of sigja.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sik.

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sej (strongly colloquial)

Pronoun[edit]

sig

  1. reflexive case of han, hon, den, det, de or man; compare himself, herself, itself, themselves, oneself
    Antagligen skulle han vilja lära sig jonglera.
    He would probably like to learn how to juggle.
    Hon lärde sig själv.
    She taught herself.
    Skar de sig på knivarna?
    Did they cut themselves on the knives?

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Western Apache[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Athabaskan *-x̯ɑ̓t. Cognates include Navajo sid, Mescalero sįh.

Noun[edit]

sig

  1. scar

Usage notes[edit]

The form sig in the White Mountain variety; sid occurs in White Mountain and Dilzhe’eh (Tonto); shig occurs in Cibecue; shid occurs in Dilzhe’eh and San Carlos varieties;