sige

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See also: SiGe

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse segja, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ-.

Verb[edit]

sige (imperative sig, infinitive at sige, present tense siger, past tense sagde, past participle har sagt)

  1. say
  2. tell
  3. mean

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sige (victory, success, triumph), see below.

Noun[edit]

sige (plural sigen)

  1. victory, triumph, success, success
    He sige hælde. — Aelfric's Treatise on the Old Testament, 1175

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *segaz (victory), from Proto-Indo-European *seghe-, *sghē- (to hold), *segʰ-. Akin to Old Frisian sige (victory), Old Saxon sigi (Middle Low German sege), Dutch zege, Old High German sigi, sigu (German Sieg), Old Norse sigr (Danish sejr, old spelling before the writing reform of 1948 Seier, Swedish seger), Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌲𐌹𐍃 (sigis), Sanskrit सहस् (sahas) - power, victory, Avestan 𐬵𐬀𐬰𐬀𐬥𐬵 (hazanh, power, victory)[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

siġe m

  1. victory, success

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Etymology of sigu (Old High German)