felt

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English[edit]

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Felt cloths.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English felt, from Proto-Germanic *feltaz (compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso 'felt' (compare Latin pilleus (felt) (adj.), Old Church Slavonic рлъсть (plŭstĭ), Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος (pîlos)), from *pel- 'to beat'. More at anvil.

Noun[edit]

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felt (uncountable)

  1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
    • Shakespeare, King Lear, act 4, scene 6:
      It were a delicate stratagem to shoe A troop of horse with felt.
  2. A hat made of felt.
  3. (obsolete) A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole art of husbandry:
      To know whether sheep are sound or not, see that the felt be loose.
Translations[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

felt (third-person singular simple present felts, present participle felting, simple past and past participle felted)

  1. (transitive) To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Matthew Hale to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, felt.
    to felt the cylinder of a steam engine
Translations[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Old English fēled, corresponding to feel +‎ -ed.

Verb[edit]

felt

  1. simple past tense and past participle of feel

Adjective[edit]

felt (comparative more felt, superlative most felt)

  1. That has been experienced or perceived.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 257:
      Conversions to Islam can therefore be a deeply felt aesthetic experience that rarely occurs in Christian accounts of conversion, which are generally the source rather than the result of a Christian experience of beauty.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German velt, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Gender changed by influence from mark.

Noun[edit]

felt c (singular definite felten, not used in plural form)

  1. field (the practical part of something)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Feld, from Old High German feld, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Noun[edit]

felt n (singular definite feltet, plural indefinite felter)

  1. field
  2. sphere, province
  3. square
Derived terms[edit]
Inflection[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Feld

Noun[edit]

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt or felter, definite plural felta or feltene)

  1. field
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

felt

  1. past participle of felle

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Feld

Noun[edit]

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt, definite plural felta)

  1. field

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]