hat

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See also: -hat, hát, hät, hāt, and hạt

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

A hat.
Rabbi Moshe Leib Rabinovich, Munkacser Rebbe, wearing a kolpik hat.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English hat, from Old English hæt, hætt (head-covering, hat), from Proto-Germanic *hattuz (hat), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to guard, cover, care for, protect). Cognate with North Frisian hat (hat), Danish hat (hat), Swedish hatt (hat), Icelandic hattur (hat), Latin cassis (helmet), Lithuanian kudas (bird's crest or tuft), Avestan [script?] (xaoda, hat), Welsh caddu (to provide for, ensure). Compare also hood.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hat (plural hats)

  1. A covering for the head, often in the approximate form of a cone or a cylinder closed at its top end, and sometimes having a brim and other decoration.
  2. (figuratively) A particular role or capacity that a person might fill.
    • 1993, Susan Loesser, A Most Remarkable Fella: Frank Loesser and the Guys and Dolls in His Life: A Portrait by His Daughter, Hal Leonard Corporation (2000), ISBN 978-0-634-00927-3, page 121:
      My mother was wearing several hats in the early fifties: hostess, scout, wife, and mother.
  3. (figuratively) Any receptacle from which numbers/names are pulled out in a lottery.
  4. (figuratively, by extension) The lottery or draw itself.
    We're both in the hat: let's hope we come up against each other.
  5. (video games) A hat switch.
    • 2002, Ernest Pazera, Focus on SDL (page 139)
      The third type of function allows you to check on the state of the joystick's buttons, axes, hats, and balls.
  6. (typography, nonstandard, rare) = háček
Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Translations[edit]

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External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hattr, hǫttr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hat c (singular definite hatten, plural indefinite hatte)

  1. hat

Inflection[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hat

  1. Third-person singular present of haben.

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *kutte (six). Cognates include Finnish kuusi, Mansi хо̄т (hōt), Khanty хәт (xa̋t).

Numeral[edit]

hat

Hungarian cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal : hat
    Ordinal : hatodik
  1. (cardinal) six
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

hat

  1. affect, have influence
  2. seem like
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
With verb prefixes

Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

hat

  1. first-person singular preterite indicative of hunn
  2. third-person singular preterite indicative of hunn
  3. second-person plural preterite indicative of hunn

Verb[edit]

hat

  1. second-person plural present indicative of haen
  2. second-person plural imperative of haen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Noun[edit]

hat n (definite singular hatet; uncountable)

  1. hatred

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Noun[edit]

hat n (definite singular hatet, uncountable)

  1. hatred

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *haitaz. Cognate with Old Frisian hēt (West Frisian hjit, Old Saxon hēt, Dutch heet, Old High German heiz (German heiß), Old Norse heitr (Swedish het). Cognate to Albanian ethe (shiver, fiever), dialectal hethe and ith (warmth, body heat), dialectal hith.

Adjective[edit]

hāt

  1. hot, fierce
    Ðeos wyrt byþ cenned on hatum stowum: this plant is grown in hot places.
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English hātan.

Noun[edit]

hāt n

  1. a promise

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hat n

  1. hatred, haught

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

English hat

Noun[edit]

hat

  1. hat

Etymology 2[edit]

English hard

Adverb[edit]

hat

  1. hard
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 3:19 (translation here):
      Na bai yu wok hat tru long kisim kaikai bilong yu na tuhat bai i kamap long pes bilong yu. Na bai yu hatwok oltaim inap yu dai na yu go bek long graun. Long wanem, mi bin wokim yu long graun, na bai yu go bek gen long graun.”
Related terms[edit]


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic خط (xaṭṭ).

Noun[edit]

hat (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. line
  2. writing

Turkmen[edit]

Noun[edit]

hat (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkmen|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkmen|{{{2}}}]])

  1. letter (written message)