ethe

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Ancient Greek ἤθη (ḗthē), the contracted nominative plural form of ἦθος (êthos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ethe pl

  1. plural form of ethos
    • 1892: Bernhard Bosanquet, A History of Aesthetic, p72
      And it is a further proof of our view, that beginners in poetry attain completeness in expression and ethe [plural of ethos], before they are capable of composing the march of incidents; almost all the earliest poets are instances of this.
    • 1942: International Universities Press, Journal of Legal and Political Sociology, p85
      The relation between social groups and their ethe is rational; they vary in fixed ratios.
    • 2003: Patchen Markell, Bound by Recognition, p76
      …it makes sense to say that these speeches are representations of their ethe.

Etymology 2[edit]

See eath.

Adjective[edit]

ethe (comparative more ethe, superlative most ethe)

  1. (obsolete) easy
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, "The Shepheardes Calender", The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 4, Charles C. Little and James Brown (1839), page 330:
      Hereto, the hilles bene nigher heaven, / And thence the passage ethe ; / As well can proove the piercing levin, / That seldome falles beneath.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *haiδ/ϑ , from Proto-Indo-European *h2eidh-o- 'burning fire'. Cognate to Ancient Greek αἶθος (aîthos, burning, fire)[1], Old English ád (funeral pile), Old Saxon ēd (firebrand).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ethe f

  1. fever

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.168

Kamba[edit]

Noun[edit]

ethe

  1. father