van

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English[edit]

A van (motor vehicle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Short for caravan.

Noun[edit]

van (plural vans)

  1. A (covered) vehicle used for carrying goods or people, usually roughly cuboid in shape, longer and higher than a car but smaller than a truck.
    The van sped down the road.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. We passed on the way the van of the guests from Asquith.
  2. (UK) A railway carriage.
  3. (UK, dated) A light wagon, either covered or open, used by tradesmen and others for the transportation of goods.
  4. Shortened form of vanguard.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, book 5, lines 588–590:
      Ten thousand thousand Ensignes high advanc'd, / Standards, and Gonfalons twixt Van and Reare / Streame in the Aire, and for distinction serve
    • 1698, Ned Ward, The London Spy
      Then a bumper to the Queen led the van of our good wishes, another to the Church Established, a third was left to the whim of the toaster []
    • 1965, translated by Chakravarthi V. Narasimhan, The Mahābhārata, book 4 Virāṭa Parva, section 33, page 84:
      Bhīṣma then outlined the following strategy: “… Let Karṇa, clad in armour, stand in the van. And I shall command the entire army in the rear.”
  5. Shortened form of caravan.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (transitive) To transport in a van or similar vehicle (especially of horses).
    • 1966, United States Congress, Senate, Committee on Commerce:
      I have to have a license to own them, a license to train them, my jockey has to have a license to ride them, the van company must have a license to van them, and the black shoe man must have a license to shoe them.
    • 1999, Bonnie Bryant, Changing Leads, p. 53:
      [They] had their own horses, but they hadn't bothered to van them over to Pine Hollow for this outing.

Etymology 2[edit]

Cornish

Noun[edit]

van (plural vans)

  1. (mining) A shovel used in cleansing ore.

Verb[edit]

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (mining) To wash or cleanse, as a small portion of ore, on a shovel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)

Etymology 3[edit]

Latin vannus (a van, or fan for winnowing grain): compare French van and English fan, winnow.

Noun[edit]

van (plural vans)

  1. A fan or other contrivance, such as a sieve, for winnowing grain.
  2. A wing with which the air is beaten.
    • Milton
      So Satan fell; and strait a fiery globe / Of Angels on full sail of wing flew nigh, / Who on their plumy vans receiv'd him soft []
    • Dryden
      He wheeled in air, and stretched his vans in vain; / His vans no longer could his flight sustain.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

van

  1. of

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of anar

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vanr (pl vanir (one of two groups of gods in Norse mythology)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vaːn/, [væːˀn]

Noun[edit]

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. one of the Vanir
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English van.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. van
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse vanr (wont, accustomed).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

van

  1. (dated) pleje van – nurse, take care of

Usage notes[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch, from Old Dutch fan (from), from Proto-Germanic *fana, *funa (from), from Proto-Indo-European *pone, *pana (from), from Proto-Indo-European *apo-, *pā- (off, of). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Old Frisian fan, fon (from), Old High German fona, fon (from).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɑn
  • IPA(key): /vɑn/
  • (Northern) [fɑn]
  • (Suriname) [fan]
  • (file)

Preposition[edit]

van

  1. of (possession, property)
    de hoed van het meisje
    the hat of the girl
    het gewicht van een olifant
    the weight of an elephant
  2. of (general association)
    Zij was van adel.
    She was of noble stock.
    een stad van één miljoen inwoners
    a city of one million inhabitants
    Hij is een man van eer.
    He's a man of honour.
    Dat is hier niet van toepassing.
    That's not applicable here.
    de trein van tien uur
    the train of ten o'clock
  3. by, of (creator)
    een schilderij van Rubens
    a painting by Rubens
    een plaat van de Beatles
    a record of the Beatles
  4. from (origin)
    Hij komt van Griekenland.
    He's from Greece.
  5. from (starting point of a movement or change)
    Hij ging van deur tot deur.
    He went from door to door.
    van vader op zoon.
    from father to son.
  6. from (starting point in time)
    van toen af aan.
    from then onwards
    van 's avonds laat tot 's morgens vroeg
    from late at night till the early morning
    van dag tot dag
    from day to day
  7. from, off (removal of something from off something else)
    het vlees van de beenderen snijden.
    to cut the meat from the bones
  8. of, out of, from, with (cause)
    sidderen van angst
    to tremble with fear
    tranen van geluk
    tears of joy
  9. of, out of, with (material or resource)
    Deze tafel is gemaakt van hout.
    This table is made (out) of wood.
    Van dit geld kan ik een basgitaar kopen.
    With this money I'm able to buy a bass.
  10. of, out of, among (out of a larger whole; partitive)
    de jongste van zijn dochters
    the youngest of his daughters
    Van alle mensen ben ik de mooiste.
    Out of all people I am the most beautiful.
    Drink niet te veel van dat bier, het is erg sterk.
    Don't drink too much of that beer, it is very strong.
  11. from, was, formerly (indicating a change in price)
    van €5, voor €3
    was €5, now €3

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

van

  1. of, from
    Ik neem er tien van. — I’ll take ten of them.
  2. from
    Ik vertrek van daar. — I’ll start from there.
  3. by, from
    Ik word er gek van. — It drives me crazy.
    Men wordt daar sloom van. — It turns one numb.
  4. of, about
    Wat zegt u daar van? — What do you say about that?
    Ik weet daar niks van. — I don’t know anything about that.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin vannus

Noun[edit]

van m (plural vans)

  1. a winnowing basket

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Adjective[edit]

van m (feminine va, masculine plural vans, feminine plural vas)

  1. empty, devoid of content, containing only air
  2. useless, ineffective
  3. (of a person) vacuous, trivial-minded

Noun[edit]

van m (plural vans)

  1. waist
  2. empty, vacant

Verb[edit]

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative of ir

Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

van m (plural vans)

  1. (agriculture) winnowing machine

Haitian Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

van

  1. wind

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Hungarian vagyon (same meaning). See Hungarian volt

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

van

  1. be, exist
  2. have; someone -nak/-nek has something -ja/-je
    Péternek van egy kutyája. - “Peter has a dog” (literally 'There is a his dog for Peter' (sic))
  3. there is
    Van itt valaki? - “Is there anybody here?”

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Omission of van and vannak:
    When using with an adjective (qualification), the forms van and vannak are not used (their place is left empty).
    Béla okos. - Béla is clever.
    It still appears if van/vannak is the focus of the sentence. This happens when the sentence means that the property described by the adjective (e.g. strength) reaches or exceeds some specified level and this is emphasized by the speaker. In this case, the adjective is preceded by a word like olyan (such), annyira (that much), elég (enough).
    Béla van annyira erős, hogy felemelje a szekrényt. - Béla is strong enough to lift the cupboard.
    The forms other than van and vannak are always used.
    Béla okos volt. - Béla was clever.
    Okos vagyok. - I am clever.
    Otherwise, all forms are used:
    With adverbs and adverbial participles (suffixed -va/-ve)
    Hogy van? - How is he? (also 'How are you?', formal singular)
    El van törve. - It is broken.
    Using in the "exists" or "there is" sense (and so with have, which is expressed by there is in Hungarian)
    Van egy ház a hegyen. - There is a house on the mountain.
    Van egy kutyám. - I have a dog.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verb prefixes):

(Expressions):


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

van (comparative plus van, superlative le plus van)

  1. vain, futile
  2. vain, worthless
  3. vain, conceited

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

van

  1. rafsi of vanju.

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English van.

Noun[edit]

van f (genitive van, plural vannyn)

  1. van (vehicle)

Synonyms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н)

  1. except

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н)

  1. (with genitive) in front of, before
    van kuće — outside, outdoors
  2. (with genitive) out of
    van zemlje — abroad

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vȃn (Cyrillic spelling ва̑н)

  1. out, outside, outdoors

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin vadere

Verb[edit]

van

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of ir.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of ir.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

van (comparative vanare, superlative vanast)

  1. accustomed to; used to, have the habit to
    Han är van vid att stiga upp klockan sju varje morgon.
    “He is used to getting up at seven every morning.”
  2. experienced, adept
    Hon är en van bilförare.
    “She is an experienced driver.”

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]